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Opinion

  • Whether you prefer donkeys or elephants, Sunday night’s passage of the health care reform bill was historic.

    On the news, at work and around the water cooler, health care seems to be quite a hot topic, and rightfully so.

    We all need it.

    Washington, D.C. politicians may sit in the capital building for years arguing, debating and pondering how to best bring health care to every citizen.

    But in Harrison County, one group is already working to make that dream a reality in Cynthiana.

  • To the editor:

    I was reading the court news a week or so ago and noticed there were far too many incidents of police being called to help find, hunt down or otherwise make a report on a missing cell phone or Ipod.

    If people insist on having these easily misplaced items glued to their ears, then they should be responsible for locking them up for safe keeping after using them.

    All these nuisance calls tie up the police and cost taxpayers money when these precious commodities could be used for more important things.

  • With the entrance of April and the coming of spring (cross your fingers), think art, because the Cynthiana Arts Council has big art plans for our small town.

    On April 18 at 2:30 p.m., the Arts Council will host a Spring Sing at the Cynthiana Baptist Church, featuring performances by our own community choir, The Licking Valley Singers.

    Tickets are $5 per person and can be purchased at Maysville Community and Technical College or at the door that day.

  • To the editor:

    Don’t look now, but little ol’ Harrison County is moving up the ladder in all-time baseball state tournament wins. Harrison County now has four state titles. Next in our sights is St. Xavier who has five, then on to Manual and Owensboro who have six each. Maybe we can catch them in the next couple of years! Okay with you, Mac?

  • Cynthiana’s history comes alive this weekend.

    Over a year ago, one Eastside Elementary fifth grader (now a sixth grader) made a big discovery of some big mistakes.

    Joe Moss was working on a project for Jeff Kinney’s fifth grade history club, when he noticed that some historical markers in the county weren’t completely accurate.

    After taking photographs of the markers on US 27 North and South, Joe noticed that the two markers had conflicting dates for the first Battle of Cynthiana, which occurred on July 17, 1862.

  • We did learn from the past.

    On Sunday evening in Cynthiana and Harrison County, it was obvious that we all were having flashbacks from the 1997 flood.

    As rain continued to fall, families in the west side of town could be found looking out front doors, loading special belongings into cars, watching the river waters creep into Rev. Ross Park and remembering an earlier flood 13 years ago that swept away everything from so many people.

    It was also evident that county, city and law enforcement officials had taken some notes after March 1997.

  • I held close to many assumptions before I became a reporter.

    Assumption #1: Police officers spend their time eating donuts and drinking coffee.

    Assumption #2: Firefighters pass the work day by  posing for calendar shoots and playing with Dalmatian dogs.

    Unfortunately, as a society, we have painted these pictures of law enforcement officials that are not true.

    Whenever anything bad happens in Cynthiana (think car accident, house fire, person trapped on a roof, etc.), I tend to see the same people.

  • To the editor:

    Harrison County Recreation Board of Directors and its Director Rick Chasteen, along with their employees of River Road Park, deserve recognition and commendation for their outstanding efforts in revitalizing the baseball fields and facility. Not many weeks ago, the park’s renovation was stricken with nature’s effects and it was doubtful that activities could begin in a timely manner. However, with hard work and dedication of park employees, and many Harrison County citizens, the youth baseball and softball programs were able to begin on time.

  • I will always believe that ‘thank you’ goes a long way.

    In my office at The Cynthiana Democrat, on the bulletin board beside my 2010 content improvement plan, a Harrison County school calendar and a piece of paper listing phone numbers for city commissioners, there’s an array of ‘thank you’ notes.

    I keep each one I receive.

    And on days when a little pick-me-up is much needed, I look no further than those cards that remind me why I do what I do.

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

  • My friend Cristy and I often ponder the deep mysteries of the universe.

    For instance, “What was God thinking?” one of us will start, then say, “by putting trans fats and carbohydrates that turn into belly lard in foods that taste good?”

    One of our favorite ponderings involves mothers. Like, what was God thinking when he created crazy, neurotic mothers?

    She has one and I am one.

  • To the editor:

    I am writing or behalf of Jordan’s Imani (Faith) Ministries, Inc. (JIM). Our organization is a non-profit designed to provide a safe environment for individuals and families to come together, to share, communicate, and to learn more about subjects that matter in their lives. To receive tools to better manage their lives with hope, faith, dignity and love by focusing on education and the renewing of their minds toward change.

  • To the Editor:

    The Harrison County School System has lost a remarkable lady. Mrs. Rita Rogers was a classroom assistant at Northside Elementary School. Over the past 20 years, Mrs. Rogers has touched the lives of thousands of students that walked through the halls of the school. She also touched the lives of many fellow staff members, including mine.

  • To the editor:

    Let’s speak out and if we all pull together, we might get our point out. So, if you are a working person, please speak out and quit paying for people who don’t work or who try to help themselves.

    The reason I am writing this is to explain my letter to the editor that appeared in a previous paper. Anyway, it is time for working people to have a say and to get help. If you are one that lives strictly off the government, you should not be allowed to booze it up and you should have to show how you spend government money.

  • A writer friend in Denver once got a letter from a now-former reader of hers who said not only would she never buy another of my friend’s books, but she would tell all her friends to boycott them too.

    The reason? The reader accused my friend of quoting from a “lesbian” Bible.

    According to the reader, supposedly the Bible translation my friend used may or may not have had a lesbian on the team of translators.

    If I told you the Bible translation you’d be shocked since it’s probably the most used modern English translation worldwide.

  • To the editor,

    My name is Lisa Poteet and Kayla was my daughter. Since that horrible day on Nov. 24, 2008, when our precious Kayla was taken from us, this community has continued to show our family love and support in so many different ways. It has meant so much to us and we will never be able to thank you enough.

  • To the editor:

    This is in regards to a previous letter to the editor about government assistant programs.

    I was told to divorce my husband, then I could get health care and other assistance. I am a diabetic and was told this in 2004. My husband of 43 years has had five bypass surgeries and six stints since 1993. He finally decided to stop working in 2001, after being told stress of work was causing his heart more harm.

  • To the editor:

    It is hard to put into words the thanks and gratitude to the people of this city and county for your generosity and support of the Harrison County Food Pantry. You just out did yourself again this year. Over 4,000 pounds of food was collected. A great big thank you goes to our postal employees that collect and weigh all this food. I know this is extra work, time and effort on their part, but without them, this would not be a success.

  • To the editor:

    This is a first for me - a letter to the editor - but there’s something I need to say to our city and county officials after the last flood. I’m very proud of the job that our current recreation director, Rick Chasteen, has and is doing at River Road Park. However, we’re still at River Road Park and not moving very fast, if at all, to the new park we have on Oddville Avenue. Let’s do what’s best for the kids and residents of the county - move to the new park and empty space we have there.