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Opinion

  • To the editor:

    In honor and memory of Apollo.

    In response to the “rumors and gossip” column in the Aug. 19 edition of the Democrat, I feel it is time to get “just the facts.” There is a laundry list of “facts” which cannot be ignored or swept under the rug as the column reported.

  • To the editor:

  • Lately I’ve been fascinated by stories of people who grew up in church and now have abandoned the denominations of their youth, and sometimes church altogether.

    In a very funny memoir, “Mennonite in a Little Black Dress,” Rhoda Janzen writes about having to wear frumpy skirts, granny panties and doilies on her head and eating lots of potatoes.

  • It won’t be long before we’ll be back in a voting booth this November.

    Several state, county and city positions will be on this year’s ballot, including seats for our state senator, state representative, county judge-executive, magistrates, mayor and city commission.

    To say it’s an important election would be an understatement.

    And so, here at The Cynthiana Democrat, we want your help.

    In local elections such as the upcoming one this fall, no one knows the candidates better than those of us who live, work and play beside them.

  • The one thing I missed most while I was away at college was the country.

    I longed for tall trees, running horses, plank fences and one-lane roads.

    Anytime I was home for a long weekend or break, I was content to drive around Harrison County with my windows down, enjoying the sweet stench of hay and cow manure.

    Perhaps the smell reminds me of my childhood years on a farm with my farmer father.

    My nephew said it best after suffering from a strong whiff of cow poop one afternoon.

    “Smells like Papaw Dunny,” he said.

    He was right.

  • To the editor:

    I do not understand the continuing objections to plans for a new store in Leesburg.

    If you know, or get to know the Tawasha family you will understand how ridiculous the objections to this new business are.

    I do agree that Highway 62 W can be, mainly because of speed, a dangerous road. More patrols and citations would do much to reduce that problem.

    Unsightly views are easily hidden by privacy fences and, if needed, evergreen trees.

  • The problem with ministers, Bible teachers and religion writers is that we’re human.

    The problem with being human – one of the many problems – is the we read and interpret passages of scripture through different prisms, depending on our experiences, past teachings, even our sinful bents. Sometimes we make the Bible say what we want it to say.

    It fascinates me how two people can read the same passage and come away with sometimes opposite interpretations.

  • To the editor:

    I have to admit, this whole mysterious Connersville cat thing is kind of exciting to me. Although the cat hasn’t eaten any humans yet, it reminds me of Jim Corbett and the man-eating leopard in India. Mr. Corbett, being a well-seasoned English Tiger hunter, was asked by the Indian government (India was under the English crown then) to hunt down and kill a man-eating leopard. If I’m not mistaken, it took eight years to get the cat! In spite of hunting it daily, the cat killed villagers at will the entire time.

  • In 1958, Connie Francis sang, “Who’s Sorry Now?” and later, Brenda Lee, Bo Diddley, The Platters and The Delfonics all sang, “I’m Sorry.”

    In today’s society, saying “I’m sorry” is the new “How are you?”

    We’ve come to expect it — demand it — of our fallen sports figures, politicians and celebrities, after which we, the public and all the talking heads on TV and radio, dissect each apology to judge whether we think the apologizer is sincere enough for our satisfaction.

  • I’m not sure of the protocol for praying for a frog, but I took my chances this morning and did it the best way I knew how.

    As my husband and I poured bleach onto our driveway, we didn’t see the frog in the grass next to the driveway and accidentally got bleach on the little guy.

    We felt terrible, and immediately my husband got out the hose to wash the frog off. Meanwhile, I prayed: “Dear God! This poor little frog! Help him! His eyes must be burning – help him, please!”

  • Despite the recent choking, smothering, summer heat these past weeks, there’s several things that are cool.

    It’s cool... that the Cynthiana Rotary Club wants to help rebuild Haiti.

    It’s cool... that engineers and architects at the University of Cincinnati have researched a building method using bags of dirt or rubble.

    It’s cool... that the new building method may allow Haiti to use their old buildings (many flattened by the January earthquake) to construct new buildings.

  • To the editor:

    The Humane Society of Harrison County wishes to extend appreciation to the area businesses, county employees and private individuals who helped to make our fourth annual auction/cookout at Flora Shropshire Animal Shelter on July 24 our most successful event to date.

    Proceeds will be used for several spay/neuter programs as well as many other efforts to promote animal welfare in our county. Thank you to everyone who participated in this worthwhile fundraising activity.

    Members of the Humane Society for Harrison County

     

  • Before we know it, it will be that time of year again.

    That time of year when Harrison County kids trade in their days beside a clear blue pool for days underneath a black chalkboard.

    Beach totes will be swapped for backpacks and tall glasses of lemonade will be replaced with milk cartons.

    Cartoons will become something only viewed on Saturday mornings... and after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays.

    It’s back-to-school time.

    As we prepared the Back-to-School section here at the Democrat office, it was hard not to think about my own school days.

  • To the editor:

  • Welcome back Cynthiana Art Walk!

    We are highly anticipating your second summer return and we know that this year you’ll be bigger than last!

    But, now, don’t get us wrong... there’s some things we hope don’t change from your first visit in Harrison County.

    Obviously, we want you to bring back the art! It wouldn’t be an Art Walk without the wide array of various artists’ work on display in our downtown shops and businesses.

  • Presents always come in unexpected packages. Each one is always filled with something surprising and indescribable.

    Cynthiana was my “present” this summer.

    In these few short months here, I have truly had some unforgettable experiences that I will carry with me for the rest of my life.

    My second day on the job, I fainted. Talk about mortifying. Residents are still asking me if I need some water or to sit down for a bit when I introduce myself.

  • Last month my friend Tara invited me over to her house to be ruthless.

    She was thinking about selling her house and wanted my advice on staging it for sale.

    I’m not a decorator or a staging expert, but I watch them on TV. Plus, I love to be ruthless.

    As we went through her house, room by room, I’d say, “This needs to go,” “Get rid of that,” “Move this here and that over there.”

    It was loads of fun — for me. I have no trouble messing with other people’s stuff.

  • To the editor:

    As I sit here on this Fourth of July weekend at River Road Park watching T-ball, I can’t keep from thinking this is the place where it all started. I’m talking about the players, our 2010 State Baseball Champions, our own Harrison County Thorobreds. I also reflect back to the time when the team was just three outs away from losing the region. There would have been no need for this article.

  • I don’t usually enjoy forwarded e-mails (unless they’re the really funny ones), but my mother recently sent me one with the title “well worth it.”

    Intrigued, I opened it.

    A YouTube video narrated by a Benedictine monk named Brother David Steindl-Rast, the message suggested that each day is something special.

    “You think this is just another day in your life?” the monk said. “It’s not just another day. It’s one day that is given to you. Today. It’s a gift.”

  • The Cynthiana Art Walk is itself, a piece of art. It began with an idea, infused with passion and many hard-working people. It happened because people believed it could and in turn, those people convinced business owners, musicians, corporations, local leaders, artists and visitors. Cynthiana residents are fortunate to have a downtown filled with law offices, dental practices, restaurants, retail shops, museum, theatre and gym. Sure, we need more, but we must remember to support what we have.