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Opinion

  • The 2009 Regular Session hit the halfway point early last week, and as expected, the General Assembly’s workload began to pick up considerably.

    It was a highly productive time for legislation I have filed on behalf of the farming community and our schools.  Along with a resolution that should be of particular interest to livestock farmers, several bills I sponsored were sent to the state Senate.

  • To the editor:

    This letter is overdue although the help sure was right on time. Ed and Jane Simpson certainly were on time during the power outage that hit the county. In fact, Ed and his company, All Points Towing, have come to our rescue many times, even when our car broke down when we were living in Winchester.

  • To the editor,

    I want to thank the Cynthiana Fire Department for rescuing my cat off of an apartment roof. She had been up there all night and day. I know I was going to have to get help, it was supposed to rain that night. I called the fire department, 15 minutes later I had my cat. She was important to me.

    Norma Landrum

    Cynthiana

  • To the editor:

     Since 1864, St. Edward’s has served the Harrison County community.  In particular, we have and continue to provide an alternative educational resource for children.  St. Edward School provides formation for the whole person:  intellectual, moral, physical, spiritual and social. 

    We would like to share some news concerning St. Edward School.  Last week Mrs. Mary Grable announced that she will be leaving her position as principal on July 1, 2009.   As a result a principal search has begun.

  • To the editor,

    I know most insurance companies are reliable and that sometimes a reasonable increase in insurance premiums is justified. I don’t like when it happens, but I understand that it can happen. Even the most reasonable person would agree, however, that three increases over a six year period, cumulatively totaling over a 100 percent hike in premiums, would be unjustified, harmful and unconscionable. That is what is being done to thousands of seniors and pre-retirees in Kentucky who bought long term care insurance years ago.

  • To the editor,

    The short month of February in the words of President Bill Clinton “is held in the depth of winter. But, by the words we speak and the faces we show, we force the spring.” A spring of rebirth, renewal and revitalization. In this short month we watch the groundhog predict the weather, observe the history of our African American brothers and sisters, honor great men like George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt and Thomas Jefferson, and celebrate the feast day of Saint Valentine.

  • To the editor:

    In the early morning hours of Tuesday, Jan. 27, freezing rain began to coat Kentucky and continued for nearly 24 hours. Trees, power lines and poles were layered with an inch or more of ice, contributing to power outages for Blue Grass Energy members that were twice the number experienced during the ice storm of 2003. At the height of outages, approximately 30,000 of Blue Grass Energy’s more than 54,000 members were without power.

  •             A few years ago I wrote about seeing a pig fly.

                What I meant by that is seeing the surprising answer to a prayer, something I thought I’d only see “when pigs fly.” In other words, never.

                But God seems to delight in never and impossible. A woman who called the newsroom last week reminded me of that.

  • The General Assembly may not have been in session last week because of a planned recess, but that didn’t mean legislators were away from the Capitol.

    Many of the House and Senate committees took the opportunity to continue holding their regular weekly meetings, including the one I oversee as chairman: the House Agriculture and Small Business Committee.

  •  

    Not long after legislators approved the state’s two-year budget last April, we began to realize that as much as we had scaled back, it still would not be enough because of the steep downturn in the nation’s economy.

                Our state economists told us last fall that, despite several hundred million dollars already being cut, we would need to come up with $456 million more to balance the budget by the end of the fiscal year on June 30, 2009.

  • To the editor:

    Last week you printed a letter concerning a lady not getting help when she needed it. This upset me, so I jumped in trying to locate this lady, which I did with the help of another person. I have talked with her, and we got everything straightened out. She was in the dark about where and whom she could turn to and the person who refused her help must have been in the dark also.

    The Food Pantry has no financial guidelines for getting food and the only time one is refused food is when it is being abused and never if children are involved.

  • To the editor,

    I would just like to write and say I think it is awful how fast people drive on US 62 E. and how heartless people can be. On Sunday, Feb. 8 my 12 month old puppy had got out and was near the road. Someone hit him and didn’t even care enough to stop.

    He passed away. It was just like losing one of my children. He was our best friend. So I hope who ever did this to our family will please slow down. We miss our babe very much and this won’t bring him back but it may save another animals life. His name was Tank.

    Heaven Herrington

  • To the editor,

    I just wanted to thank everyone that worked so hard during the ice storm, especially the Cynthiana Christian Church.

    They made all those without power feel right at home and ran the shelter in a first class manner. Also, thanks to all those businesses that donated food, it was greatly appreciated and no one went without.

    County Judge Alex Barnett came into the shelter on a daily basis to keep everyone abreast of the restoration progress being made. Too bad we can’t clone Alex.

  • Along with zillions of other people, my daughter, Alison, writes a blog.

    As The Neurotic Housewife, Alison writes about her life as a stay-at-home mom, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed getting to know this side of her in a horrifying sort of way.

    It’s like looking into a mirror.

    Oscar Wilde once said, “All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy.”

    As my girls grew up, I often taunted them with that. Oh yeah? You think I’m a fruitcake? Just wait until you get older and you find yourself doing the exact same things.

  • To the editor:

    CNN newscasters announced this past week that 598,000 jobs were lost in January 2009 in the United States. One reporter said it is the worst job loss in 34 years. Another commented that our economy looks a lot like it did at the beginning of the Great Depression. Scary times, they all agreed. 

  • To the editor:

    Kentucky and horses... They’re a natural combination that has made the Bluegrass State the “Horse Capital of the World.” But Kentucky’s stake to the title is at risk.

    States that have historically have been unable to compete with Kentucky recognize the horse industry’s viability and success and are attracting Kentucky-based horsemen with enhanced purses and breeder incentives which will substantially alter Kentucky racing in the next one to three years.

  • The General Assembly returned to Frankfort early last week, with the aftermath of last month’s snow and ice storm and the ongoing budget problems understandably taking up much of our time.

  • I promised Gator that I would write about him.

    His real name is Mike, and he lives in the woods in a camp with some other people.

    I only met him briefly, which is par for the course for reporters. We get to know people long enough to get what we need for a story, but often not long enough to care.

    I’m talking about myself here, and the truth is I’m not proud of it. But I’m telling you this because God’s been chipping away at my uncaring, although he’s got a long way to go.

  • While other big-spending state politicians went to Washington seeking a handout, South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford went to “beg” (his word, not mine) federal politicians not to bail out states.

    Sanford understands something most economically illiterate politicians - a majority of Kentucky lawmakers - do not: Bailouts do not fix fiscal problems. Bailouts make them worse.

  • To the editor,

    It is impossible to name the utility linemen what worked in our area to restore electricity. But it is clear that they did an outstanding job. For that I thank them.

    Then there are the neighbors and friends that deserve a big thank you. Among them are Billy Doyle, Jamie Snapp, Bruce Kennedy, Russell Harris, Dustin Rose, and Chester McCauley.