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Opinion

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

    I was wondering if there was going to be a debate this election. And if not, why? There has been a debate in our past election years. I feel it would benefit all voters to have a debate so we can hear first hand what the issues are that each person is concerned with and how they plan on doing for our town.

    Regina Williams

    Cynthiana

     

  • To the editor:

  • One day last week I was at the market buying bananas, broccoli slaw and Vidalia onions and when the kid bagging my groceries asked, “How are you today?” I told him, “I’m so hungry I could eat my arm.”

    We both laughed and then when I got to my car I gobbled a banana in about three bites because, frankly, my arm was looking pretty tasty.

  • To the editor:

  • At Landmark Community Newspapers, Inc., Shelbyville, KY (which I serve as postal consultant after retiring in 2008 from a 35-year career), when we face tough economic times, we have to make tough decisions. But ultimately, our goal is to grow our business by providing services that consumers want and need at competitive prices.

    When our business grows, so do jobs. If we do business right, our customers grow with us. In the end, making the right choices is right for the economy, jobs and our businesses.

  • To the editor:

    Under bright, sunny skies, the ninth annual Rev. Ross Bike Race took place. A good crowd was on hand to provide encouragement for the competitors. The day’s events concluded with spectators and contestants enjoying some water balloon tossing.

    The results for the race were as follows:

  • On an evening stroll with my husband and dog last week, I was admiring the progress of several projects at Flat Run Veterans Park.

    Playground equipment beckons small children to the center of the park.

    The unique earth-bag structure, sponsored by the Cynthiana Rotary Club, has walls.

    The presence of heavy equipment and long lines of trenches indicates a sewer line will soon be completed for the new Farmers Market building.

    But among all the progress, destruction slapped me in the face.

  • A new dish tops the menu at this year’s Kentucky State Fair.

    Meet the Krispy Kreme cheeseburger.

    Think of a regular cheeseburger. Now, take off the bun and replace it with a Krispy Kreme glazed donut on the top and bottom.

    And it’s not just Kentuckians buying the 1,000-calorie-loaded concoction.

    At the Wisconsin State Fair earlier this month, patrons could not only buy the Krispy Kreme cheeseburger, they could also pay an extra dollar to top it off with chocolate-covered bacon.

    I like donuts.

    I like hamburgers.

  • As I was on my knees one Saturday afternoon, I had an epiphany.

    Lest you think I was on my knees praying, I wasn’t, although Lord knows I should have been. And it wasn’t so much an epiphany as it was a random thought.

    My husband and I were painting, he up on a ladder, me on my knees with a brush painting the bottom of the walls along the edging.

  • To the editor:

    On the last weekend of August, we joined almost 100 Kentuckians from Lexington (12 buses altogether from Kentucky), on a trip to Washington DC to attend the Glenn Beck “Restore Honor” rally at the Lincoln Monument. It coincided with the 47th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the same location.

  • An elderly man walked into my office several years ago demanding that I tell him why I would print his grandson’s DUI in the paper.

    I hadn’t been editor long, but I knew the answer.

    “It’s public record,” I said. “We print records without exception.”

    He leaned into my desk from where he towered above me, pointed his finger in my face and declared... “This place ain’t nothin’ that a can of gas and match wouldn’t take care of.”

  • On a dark and cloudless Saturday night, while participating in a glow ball golf tournament at the Cynthiana Country Club, I started counting my many blessings:

    It was dark.

    No one had a camera.

    It was dark.

    My foursome was made up of family.

    It was dark.

    I didn’t need an ambulance to carry me off the course.

    And, it was blessedly, totally, undeniably dark.

    OK. This is the story I’m going with and sticking to.

  • To the editor:

    In honor and memory of Apollo.

    In response to the “rumors and gossip” column in the Aug. 19 edition of the Democrat, I feel it is time to get “just the facts.” There is a laundry list of “facts” which cannot be ignored or swept under the rug as the column reported.

  • To the editor:

  • Lately I’ve been fascinated by stories of people who grew up in church and now have abandoned the denominations of their youth, and sometimes church altogether.

    In a very funny memoir, “Mennonite in a Little Black Dress,” Rhoda Janzen writes about having to wear frumpy skirts, granny panties and doilies on her head and eating lots of potatoes.

  • It won’t be long before we’ll be back in a voting booth this November.

    Several state, county and city positions will be on this year’s ballot, including seats for our state senator, state representative, county judge-executive, magistrates, mayor and city commission.

    To say it’s an important election would be an understatement.

    And so, here at The Cynthiana Democrat, we want your help.

    In local elections such as the upcoming one this fall, no one knows the candidates better than those of us who live, work and play beside them.

  • The one thing I missed most while I was away at college was the country.

    I longed for tall trees, running horses, plank fences and one-lane roads.

    Anytime I was home for a long weekend or break, I was content to drive around Harrison County with my windows down, enjoying the sweet stench of hay and cow manure.

    Perhaps the smell reminds me of my childhood years on a farm with my farmer father.

    My nephew said it best after suffering from a strong whiff of cow poop one afternoon.

    “Smells like Papaw Dunny,” he said.

    He was right.

  • To the editor:

    I do not understand the continuing objections to plans for a new store in Leesburg.

    If you know, or get to know the Tawasha family you will understand how ridiculous the objections to this new business are.

    I do agree that Highway 62 W can be, mainly because of speed, a dangerous road. More patrols and citations would do much to reduce that problem.

    Unsightly views are easily hidden by privacy fences and, if needed, evergreen trees.

  • The problem with ministers, Bible teachers and religion writers is that we’re human.

    The problem with being human – one of the many problems – is the we read and interpret passages of scripture through different prisms, depending on our experiences, past teachings, even our sinful bents. Sometimes we make the Bible say what we want it to say.

    It fascinates me how two people can read the same passage and come away with sometimes opposite interpretations.