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Opinion

  • ‘When I was about 10 I had gorilla legs, which embarrassed me horribly.

    Next to my fair-haired classmates who all had fine downy fuzz on their legs, I thought I stood out and that everyone thought I was as hideous as I considered myself to be.

    That was also in the olden days when girls weren’t allowed to wear pants to school, so I couldn’t hide my legs underneath a pair of jeans.

  • To the editor:

    There has been a lot of talk in town about the Hassalls selling their house. Some people are even concerned they are getting dollars out of it. I would like to share with you what I got out of their house.

    I got the privilege of working with all of the professionals and volunteers who gave of their time and money to work on it. I got to see the “best side” of my hometown, (businesses and public) who gave so much. I also got the satisfaction of helping give a deserving family a helping hand.

  • To the editor:

    On Nov. 24, 2008, our 16-year-old daughter Kayla and our 15- year-old daughter Brandi were in a car accident with two of their friends. Our daughter Kayla did not make it and Brandi was seriously injured. It has been 6 months since the accident but we have not forgotten anything that anyone has done for us. We would like to thank everyone for all your calls, cards, support, love and prayers that we have received since that horrible day. The outpour that we received and still receive has been tremendous and we appreciate everything that everyone has done for us.

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

    In my opinion, we can collect a general opinion about people by their actions, but unless we know them on an intricate level, it is impossible to know their full situation. So I am baffled when I read letters criticizing the Hassall family for selling their house.   

  • To the editor:

  • Several years ago I wrote a story for the newspaper about two local sisters who raise chickens and sell the eggs.

    As part of my, um, research, I ate some fresh-out-of-the-chicken eggs, sunny-side up, if I recall. That’s the way I like my eggs, but I also like them scrambled with onions and artichoke hearts, or maybe mushrooms.

    I’m so glad eggs are no longer on the Evil Foods list (and if they still are, please don’t tell me). I love eggs!

  • To the editor:

  • To the editor:

    Recently there have been some articles on the state of the economy in Cynthiana and negative aspects of our community. We are all pretty good at voicing what’s wrong with Cynthiana. Ask anyone and you will get a laundry list of problems, ending with the comment ‘Someone ought to do something,’ or possibly posing the question, ‘Why doesn’t Someone do something?’

    Just for a change, why don’t we turn the question around and ask “What’s good about Cynthiana?” and “What should Someone do?”

  • “You can paint on the basement floor,” my mother told me.

    I was eight years old or younger... and stunned.

    Mom was going to let me paint on the floor? I was going to be able to use the gray concrete as my huge blank canvas?

    “On the floor?” I asked, just to make sure my ears weren’t deceiving me.

    “Yes... on the floor,” Mom repeated again, probably in between loads of laundry or meal preparations.

    And so I, gathered up all my paints and brushes and went to the basement where I painted on the floor.

  • To the editor:

    My name is Richard Adams. We just moved to Cynthiana on April 3, 2009, when our house burned down. We lost just about everything.

    But the little town of Harrison County came to my family’s rescue.

    I would like to thank the people of Harrison County for the donations they have given to my family. I would like to thank Brad and Tonya Clark, Ron and Cynthia Jenkins, John and Rae-Jean Slusher and of course, my brother, Jerry and his wife Tunya Adams, all of Living Hope Assembly of God.

  • To the editor:

    I want to point out that 911 is a valuable asset to our community. However, when I called at midnight feeling desperate, they couldn’t tell me what to do. They said they could send me an ambulance, but recommended I call the hospital emergency room on how to stop the bleeding.

    My seventeen-year-old son ran a knife into the palm of his hand, severing a vein - blood was squirting like a fountain. I panicked and couldn’t even think what to do.

    “Call 911! They’ll know,” I said to myself.

  • Editor’s note: The original speech has been edited for space.

    Well, you made it! William T. Young said that to my graduating class in 2003 when I graduated from Transylvania University and I always said that if I was ever given the opportunity to speak at a commencement celebration, I would repeat those words because in a great sense, this moment is more than just making it through classes and walking across a stage.

  • Perhaps I was totally naive, because I used to think that drug use didn’t affect me.

    I didn’t do drugs. It didn’t harm my life, so why should I care?

    As a reporter at The Cynthiana Democrat, I began to realize that drug use is prominent in this community, and its death grip impacts more than just those injecting the narcotics.

    On the front page of last week’s paper, Becky Barnes reported that six individuals had been charged with drug-related offenses, a testament to the fact that drugs are present in our small town.

  • While out for our semi-regular Sunday drive, as I flipped through the radio stations I asked my husband what kind of music he liked.

    That’s the kind of questions you ask on a first date, not after 34 years of marriage!

    I’m not sure what that says about the state of our marriage. You don’t even know what kind of music your husband likes?

    Um, not exactly, although I have a good idea what he doesn’t like. I can rule out heavy metal and polka and most music recorded after 1979.

  • To the editor:

    It seems like everything we hear these days is negative. You know - bad economy, businesses closing, lost jobs and so on. We thought we could share some thoughts that might start people thinking positive, at least locally.

  • To the editor:

    One day, as Jesus left the temple, He saw a blind man. The disciples asked Jesus, “Why was this man born blind? Was it a result of his sins or those of his parents?”

    “Neither this man nor his parents sinned,” said Jesus, “but this happened so that the work of God might be displayed in his life” (John 9: 1-3).

    Like the blind man, every one of us was born the way we were born so that the work of God may manifest itself through us. We were purposefully designed by our Creator.

  • To the editor:

    The end of the school year will be here before you know it. We invite you to consider joining us in our mission of forming the mind, heart and soul of children. To that end, St. Edward offers a preschool program which serves children ages 3, 4 and 5 and a school which serves students kindergarten through fifth grade.

  • To the editor:

    Our annual Equal Pay Day Event is held each year as a reminder that it takes an extra three and one half months for women to make the same as our mate counterparts do in 12 months. Currently women make 77 cents to every one dollar men make.

  • Those who know me know my two grand passions: cake with buttercream frosting and the “Gilmore Girls.”

    Currently, I’m watching season two on DVD.

    For those who don’t know about the “Gilmore Girls,” it’s a now-canceled TV series about a single mother and her teenage daughter who live in Stars Hollow, a quirky little town outside Hartford, Conn. The mother, Lorelai Gilmore, is young, gorgeous, witty, talks a mile a minute, loves movies and TV and eats like a horse.