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Opinion

  • A legislative session is a marathon, not a sprint. Very few bills make it through the lengthy process of becoming law in five days — the minimum necessary under our Constitution — especially so early in the year. But the chance to capture millions of dollars in federal funding for our schools was an opportunity we had to jump on immediately. House Bill 176 became the first piece of legislation to reach Governor Beshear’s desk this year as both chambers worked quickly to allow state education officials time to complete their application for the funding.

  • To the editor:

    During the year of 2009, I painted inside Grand Haven nursing home. I had to work all shifts because of the residents. All the workers - from the top staff of Roy, Judy and Sissie to the rest of the workers - gave the residents great care. Never once did I hear a harsh word. They were always answered with “Honey, may I help you.” So if you have a loved one or friend there, they are getting good care. Now all they need is a visit from you.

    Ervin “Slick” Garrison

    Cynthiana

     

  • The General Assembly returned to the Capitol early last week to kick off the 2010 regular session, with a top priority of putting together what promises to be a tough two-year budget.

    The day after the session began, Governor Steve Beshear came before the legislature to offer the annual “State of the Commonwealth” speech, and he took the opportunity not only to note the challenges we face but some of the successes we have had as well.

  • I’m currently reading “A Million Miles in a Thousand Years” by Don Miller.

    He wrote “Blue Like Jazz,” which continues to be the best Christian book I’ve ever read, although not for its literary merit. The book is random and messy, but Miller’s thoughts are raw and profound.

    His new book begins with a movie producer wanting to turn “Blue Like Jazz” into a movie, but he tells Miller that the book as is wouldn’t make a compelling or interesting movie because his real life is boring.

  • God and Jesus will provide whatever is needed for the people who spend eternity in the new heaven and new earth. Rev. 22:1-5  “And he showed me a river of the water of life, clear as crystal, coming from the throne of God and of the Lamb. In the middle of the street and on either side of the river was the tree of life, bearing twelve kinds of fruit, and yielding its fruit every month; and the leaves of the tree were for the healing (or health) of the nations.

  • For as long as I can remember, I have been addicted to sweets.

    I believe myself to be a gal of substantial willpower. I can go without fries, soft drinks and donuts.

    But when it comes to desserts, I must admit, I get a bit weak in the knees.

    Even as I sit here at my desk, visions of sweet things dance in my head.

  • One childhood Christmas memory is receiving a shiny red plastic doctor’s kit. I went from family member to family member looking inside their mouths while they played along with my fantasy career.

    I’m beginning to think that we are humoring a group of lawmakers who have no more qualifications to make a diagnosis than I did.

    In their fantasy careers, lawmakers believe they should go over the heads of experts to tell the public what’s best for their health care.

    I’m more than a little concerned.

  • Maybe it’s the recession. Or the perilous state of the war in Afghanistan. Or the growing sense that other nations — China, India, Brazil — are rising at a clip we can’t match. Suddenly, though, doubts are surfacing about whether our political system can handle the challenges that confront the United States.

  • Like myself, I’m sure many people were the recipients of electronic gadgets and gizmos this Christmas.

    In fact, no one will probably read this column because we’re all still trying to figure out how to work the darn things.

    My niece had to show me how to open the laptop I received for my birthday and Christmas.

    She let me struggle for a couple minutes.

    “Kate, you open it from the other side,” Emma patiently said.

    She’s 10 years old.

    “Great, I’ve become my mother,” I thought in my head.

  • I remember my aunt having the most beautiful Christmas tree ever.

    I was probably 10 or so when my family traveled to St. Petersburg, Fla., for a Christmas vacation.

    We walked into my aunt’s house, happy to be out of the car for awhile. And there, just inside the door, was the  biggest and brightest tree I had ever seen. There were blue bulbs and baubles hanging from the boughs.

    The boughs, yes the boughs.

  • One day last week, as I drove back to the newsroom after doing an interview, the message on the spare tire cover on the black Jeep in front of me caught my attention:

    Life is good.

    I had just come from one of my favorite places, the Key Training Center. A longtime resident had spent an entire year buying toys for the U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots program and she was bursting with joy.

  • At my house, the Christmas tree assembly and decoration marks the official kick-off to the holiday season.

    If the Christmas tree is up, then it is deemed okay to buy presents, wrap presents and start making fruit cake.

    The Christmas tree might be the center of all family holiday festivities, but it can also be the cause of some family disagreements... at least in the Darnell household.

    There is the all important debate over white lights versus colored lights.

    Strings of beads or ribbon?

    A bow at the top or a tree-topper?

  • When I met my husband, he drove a totally hot car, a brand-new 1973 Mercury Comet GT, white with burnt orange pinstripes and burnt orange interior.

    And it had a manual transmission.

    Because we were young and newly in love and Barry had miles of patience, he attempted to teach me to drive it. It helped that we lived in Northern Maine where there wasn’t much to crash into except snow banks and caribou.

  • To the editor:

    I noted another accident on US 62 that sent two people to the hospital. I have no idea what gets into people’s minds (probably nothing) that causes them to ignore the highway center lines.

    I drive into Cynthiana at least four times a week and daily see people over the center lines, to the point of having a mirror-to-mirror impact.

    Combining lack of attention with speeding, and it’s a common occurrence.

    Ronald Dumm

    Harrison County

  • "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." -Voltaire, 18th Century French philosopher

    And, so it is with letters to the editor.

    I don’t always agree with opinions that readers want to express in our Mailbag section. In fact, sometimes I even huff and mumble when I read them.

    Newspapers stand for freedoms of speech and expression. How can we defend those freedoms then turn around and censor letters just because we don’t agree with them?

  • Christmas columns are not hard to write in Cynthiana. You never have to look far to find someone who is trying to make this holiday season brighter for someone else, many times without even knowing the recipient of that good cheer.

    But despite the abundance of good this holiday season - whether its Christmas boxes filled with food or donated toys for children - it’s always refreshing and inspiring to see people helping people.

    The Dailey family is used to helping people. They pull vehicles out of all corners of the earth on a daily basis.

  • Cynthiana never looked so beautiful.

    I’ve seen Cynthiana from the air before. I’ve been in the passenger seat of small planes that took off and landed at our own airstrip with the capable pilots of first, Reed Anderson many years ago, then Doug Coy, and Jim Wornall. I’ve also flown with Richard Colvin from the Pendleton County airport.

    But nothing had prepared me for breathtaking  sights to be seen from the backseat of an ultralight.

  • During last week’s Harrison County Fiscal Court meeting, county leaders discussed giving pay raises to county employees.

    Judge Alex Barnett recommended a 5 percent increase “based on the financial condition” of the county.

    From the discussions around the table it appeared magistrates were weighing in on both sides of the issue. However, all were in agreement that the men and women who make up the county’s payroll work hard. That’s never been the issue.

  • Since the middle of August, The Cynthiana Democrat has published four articles and five letters to the editor regarding the proposed zone change at the Business Park.

    By now, readers are aware that United Propane Gas asked for the zone change in the corner lot of the industrial park, which neighbors Connersville Pike.

    The proposed request asked that the lot be rezoned ‘heavy industrial’ to allow for the storage of propane gas.

  • In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to his own town to register.