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Letters

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    The annual Cynthiana/Harrison County NAACP Scholarship Gala is just around the corner and I would like to say “thank you” to all who have supported this known organization to continue to be recognized in our community as we move forward. this will be our 13th year to celebrate this event and be of any support to our community to grow and move beyond any obstacles that may be a hindrance to our progress as we stand firm to our commitment.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    Growing up, my brother, sisters and I never realized that we were poor. We just knew that we did not have everything that the other kids had, but we had all that we needed. Clothes, food on the table, a warm bed at night and two parents that sacrificed and loved us dearly.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    On Monday, July 17, 2017 in Cynthiana, Kentucky the Bill of Rights, the United States Constitution the socio-economic status of the nation and democracy itself was spared by the passing of an ordinance to allow Sunday alcohol sales in Cynthiana. Or at least that is what some would have you believe in the speeches made in support of the sales.
    It is not hard to see how the lost in Cynthiana have no problem with this. I couldn’t  figure out why I have a problem with it myself until thinking about it in depth. It finally dawned on me.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    At the time I purchased the property, which is now Ashford Acres Inn, I could have easily chosen a property in Los Angeles, where I spend a large portion of my time, or a property in Lexington, a city that gets many more tourists than Cynthiana or surrounding counties. This choice likely would have been wiser when considering future profitability.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    I stand opposed to the sale of alcohol on Sunday. In brighter and better days of our nation’s past, the Bible-believing New England Puritans set Sunday apart from the week as a day of worship and rest. That practice endured for over 300 years.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    This is in answer to the letter from Jayne Whitson Newman. By the way I don’t live in Berry, but outside the city.
    You have to be one very miserable person. For all you can see is what you call bad - wrong misuse of funds etc. By the way do you know what playground equipment costs? Well I checked it out on the internet. Boy was I ever in for a shock. That stuff is very expensive.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    On behalf of the Cynthiana Alumni Association I’d like to thank Virgie Wells for her review of our alumni celebration in last week’s Democrat.
    We are happy and proud for the number of former students and alumni who meet every year to renew old friendships and catch up on each other’s news.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    It has been 21 days plus since the Berry Festival on June 3, yet the Port a Potty still remains in place in the center of the only playground the children have in which to play. It has not been removed nor has the waste from the festival been cleaned out. You can imagine what it is like in this heat. The children say it stinks terribly, has flies and is also loaded with maggots. I went to look. They are right.

  • Mailbag

    To the editor:
    First off, kudos to Lee Kendall for his excellent editorial last week. Hope he did not get too many hate calls and letters.
    I read that California has placed Kentucky on a no travel list because of some of our legislation. We must have scared the poor snowflakes. Most insecure groups strike out at anyone that does not agree with their group think and react with negative actions. They fear that anyone that thinks differently challenges the validity of their beliefs.
    Unfortunately, we have a similar situation right here in the Maiden City.

  • Supports Amish community

    To the editor:
    After reading the article titled “Amish buggies cause traffic concerns for fiscal court,” I felt the need to respond by pointing out the importance and pride I felt as county Judge-executive Alex Barnett stood up for a counter-cultural existence in our community. Citing the lack of jurisdiction over religious matters, he made a very important covert point that I felt should be illuminated.