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Columns

  • Former Cynthiana chief to be honored in Police Memorial Ceremony on Tuesday

    It was well before my time, July 29, 1939, when Cynthiana’s police chief responded to what is today considered a “domestic” situation.
    The 25-year veteran police officer approached the property where a man was abusing a teenage girl. As he was getting out of his car, he was shot in the back by the man who was hiding in his barn.
    Chief George Dickey died of his injuries.
    He will be remembered during a police memorial service in Richmond on Tuesday, May 22.

  • What’s in a name….?

    “If it’s ‘community service’ I don’t want to have anything to do with it!” said a Harrison County High School student during the school’s first-ever Volunteer Fair.
    Sponsored by the Cynthiana Rotary Club and the Harrison County Board of Education, the Volunteer Fair took place in the high school gymnasium on April 19.
    Throughout the day, groups of students were brought in to learn about how they could help the more than 25 community organizations represented.  

  • Don't start it unless you know you can finish it

    Normally I refrain from talking about issues pertaining to county or city issues even though my editor would argue that it is part of my job.
    Whether it is dealing with money issues or how development property could best serve our citizens, I simply never like putting myself out for criticism when its my ideas being read.
    However, I was approached this past weekend by a couple talking about development projects in our community and simply felt compelled to share their thoughts, which heavily shadow the same feelings that I have.

  • $4.5 million state road plan

    After spending more than three months addressing the needs of the state, the General Assembly wrapped up its work on Friday with the enactment of a $4.5 billion road plan and a new initiative to limit the sky-rocketing prescription drug abuse that Kentucky has unfortunately seen over the last decade.

  • A deadly stretch of highway put to rest

    Last week we reported on the pending reconstruction of U.S. 27 North between mile points 11.9 and 12.4.
    Finally, a road project I can get behind wholeheartedly.
    I have repeatedly said I’m on the fence about the by-pass. There are pros and cons.
    With the reconstruction, I can find no cons.
    I’m certain the property owners whose homes might be in danger feel differently. However, had the design been done properly back in the 1980s, this would be a non-issue today.

  • Classmates gather for 50th year reunion

    Flipping through the pages of an old leather bond yearbook, one will see many faces.
    How they went and where they went to high school is much different from how many others have gone.
    Many of the names are not remembered and some have gone on to do great things that stamp their names in the pages of history forever.
    In 1962, a tradition was put to rest that began back in September 1872.
    That tradition included teaching students in the graded areas of Latin, analysis, surveying, mental philosophy and history.

  • It's a busy time in our fair city

    If you find yourself saying “There’s nothing to do” in Cynthiana over the next few weeks, it’s your own fault.
    I find myself wondering how or if I’ll get it all in.
    This weekend, The Licking Valley Singers will have two spring performances with a stroll down the rock’n roll memory lane.
    It’ll be the Beach Boys meeting Grease and Happy Days all rolled into one with some of the best of the oldies music.

  • Legislative session’s final day set aside for considering vetoes

    On Thursday this week, the General Assembly returns for the legislative session’s final day, which is traditionally set aside for considering any vetoes the governor may issue.
    This year, however, there will also be other work done during that time, which is expected to include passing the state’s road plan, approving a major initiative designed to crack down on prescription drug abuse and giving the go-ahead to an innovative proposal that will use coal-severance dollars to boost the number of four-year college degrees in coal-producing counties.

  • Countdown of greatest superheroes

    Most of the time I have to think before I am able to write my column for the week.
    However, on Monday morning, which started out as one of the worst in a long time, I simply had an idea slam into my head.
    I love looking on the internet to see top 10’s of different categories.
    Whether it is top 10 movies, athletes, college sports or dumb quotes of all time, I like to research those.
    The lists of top 10’s go on forever.

  • House, senate supports spending plan

    When the General Assembly began the 2012 Regular Session in January, there was little doubt what its biggest challenge would be: writing a two-year budget that could continue meeting the state’s critical needs in light of previous cuts totaling more than a billion dollars.
    On Friday evening, after weeks of discussion and several late nights working on a compromise, the House and Senate put its support behind a spending plan that will go a long way to achieving that goal.