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Today's News

  • Sports beat

    Harrison County Football Alumni meeting set
    The Harrison County Football Alumni meeting will be held Jan. 27 at 2 p.m. at the Harrison County Sheriff’s Office to prepare for the 2013 annual football banquet. There will be discussion about Hall of Fame inductees, scholarship awards and other Harrison County Football Alumni business.
    Fellow alumni and any one interested in promoting Harrison County football is encouraged to attend. For more information contact Jim Furnish at 859-234-1904.

    Thunder Run tryouts

  • Deputy turning in his badge after 23 years

     

    After 23 years of service to the community, Harrison County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve McCauley says it is time to hang it up.

  • Fillies take a step back in loss at Mason Co.

    After the game Monday night in Mason County, Fillies’ Assistant Coach Chris Reffett said that the coaches felt like the team took a step backward in the stifling loss.  
    “We thought that we had made some improvement with our ball handling and ability to withstand defensive pressure, especially after Saturday’s game, but tonight it was like we had never worked on it at all,” he concluded.
    The Fillies began the game with one of the worst quarters of the season.  

  • HCMS Colts
  • First baby of 2013 arrives on Jan. 2

    Harrison County’s first baby of the year at Harrison Memorial Hospital waited nearly two days after the new year before making her arrival.

    Ma’Layah Ray Pennington was born at 8:41 p.m. on Jan. 2 to Melissa Koutz and Brandon Ray Pennington, Cynthiana.

  • Burden indicted for abuse of 2-year-old child

    David Alan Burden II, 22, was one of six people indicted by a Harrison County grand jury on Thursday, Jan. 3.
    Burden is lodged in the Bourbon County Detention Center where he has been since Nov. 8 when he was arrested on a charge of first degree criminal abuse.
    Burden is accused of intentionally abusing his 2-year-old son, causing serious physical injury in a situation that may have caused serious injury, torture, cruel confinement or cruel punishment.
    His bond is $50,000.

  • King wants to change guilty plea

    The Cynthiana man who had two criminal cases filed against him within a two-month period was in court Thursday to withdraw his guilty plea to 11 charges.
    Judge Jay Delaney will rule on the motion at a Jan. 22 hearing in Harrison Circuit Court.
    Michael King, 47, was first charged following a March 13, 2012, incident where King is accused of setting fire to a couch at property belonging to the Housing Authority of Cynthiana. King’s son was inside the residence and three of his neighbors were also home.

  • MSP robbed at knife point

    A knife-wielding suspect is still being sought by Cynthiana Police after he robbed a convenience store cashier last Thursday.
    Cynthiana Ptl. Dottie Batte said the man brandished his weapon and took off on foot with the loot from the cashier’s drawer at Shell Apple Market about 1 a.m. on Jan. 3.
    The suspect was described as a white man, who was wearing a red hooded sweatshirt and black sweat pants with a red bandana or handkerchief covering his face.

  • Tobacco buy-out money still leading Harrison County farm subsidies

    In 2011, the  most recent figures available, over $1 million came into Harrison County through agriculture/farm subsidies.
    According to Gary Carter, Harrison County Extension Agent for Agriculture, the bulk of that income is through the tobacco buyout for which there is only one year remaining on those payments.
    Farm subsidies started in the 1920s when the government initiated the payments to spur farmers to grow products that could be used as food.

  • Keep African violets in bloom all winter

    African violets are often purchased in a blooming state.  Then, many of us wonder why they never bloom again.  
    What have we done, or not done, to turn these dainty flowering plants into something that can only be appreciated for its fuzzy foliage?
    Like orchids, African violets are much easier to grow than many of us think.  
    If you create a favorable growing environment, they should continue to produce blooms year round with an occasional rest period.