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Today's News

  • I’m livin’ a tomato dream; don’t wake me

    Last year I elaborated on the woes of my “garden” and the tomatoes it didn’t produce.
    It’s only fitting that I come back with my Year Two assessment.
    As you may or may not remember, my son made an 8-by-8 raised bed for me last year as part of my Mothers’ Day gift.
    I planted possibly too many plants in the limited area. That, combined with too much rain and water from the hose, made for less than desirable produce.

  • Church News

    CALVARY ASSEMBLY
    Youth revival will be held Wednesday-Friday, Aug. 22-24 at 7 p.m. nightly at Calvary Assembly, 325 Webster Ave., across from the high school. Speaker will be Rodney Goodlett. All youth are invited for special singing, worship, pizza, games, and fun times with friends.
    Bud Gauze is the youth pastor. For more information call 234-4646 or visit www.calvaryshill.net.

    CORNERSTONE
    ASSEMBLY FULL GOSPEL

  • The hope for eternal life

    When people ask me what I do at my job at the newspaper, specifically what topics I write about, I tell them the shorthand version: old people, dead people and God.
    Actually, I cover a lot more than that, but those three — old people, dead people and God — are the three areas that seem to fall to me.
    This past week I wrote stories about four people who had died, and only one of them I would consider old.
    Of those four people, I attended three memorial services. As I write this, I have two services to attend in the coming week.

  • Community Calendar

    THURSDAY, Aug. 23

  • To can or to freeze?

    Many vegetables and fruits are now ready for harvesting, and many gardeners will have more produce than they can readily eat. Those who want to preserve fresh, summer foods for later consumption will consider either freezing or canning the harvest. But is one way of preservation better than the other? The answer depends on the type of food you want to preserve. 
    If proper techniques and correct temperatures are used, frozen foods retain greater amounts of their vitamin content, natural color, flavor and texture.

  • Flu shots available all day, every day at all Rite Aid Pharmacies nationwide

    Rite Aid Corporation (NYSE: RAD) announces that seasonal flu shots are now available at all Rite Aid pharmacies nationwide. Customers can visit any of the Rite Aid pharmacies nationwide and receive a flu shot from a Rite Aid certified immunizing pharmacist, subject to state regulations, during pharmacy hours, no appointment necessary. Flu shots are $29.99 each and are covered by many insurance plans, including Medicare Part B. To locate the nearest Rite Aid pharmacy, visit www.riteaid.com or call 1-800-RITE-AID.

  • Synthetic Drugs 101

    By Jessica Miller, J.D.
    We have all seen the frightening headlines about bath salts and synthetic marijuana, but most people do not understand what synthetic drugs are or the harm that these drugs cause.

  • School Menus

    Aug. 27-31
    * Menus subject to change due to weather and delivery.

    BREAKFAST
    ST. EDWARD SCHOOL
    MONDAY: Toasted cheese sandwich or cereal with toast, yogurt, juice choices, choice of milk.
    TUESDAY: French toast sticks or cereal w/toast, yogurt, juice choices, choice of milk.
    WEDNESDAY: Sausage biscuit or cereal w/toast, yogurt, juice choices, choice of milk.
    THURSDAY: Scrambled eggs and sausage links or cereal w/toast, yogurt, juice choices, choice of milk.

  • Crossword Puzzle

    Across
    1. Like a tasteless remark
    6. Precedes Nov.
    9. Wood file
    13. Slow in music
    14. _____ Beta Kappa
    15. Historic 66
    16. One with a healthy appetite is often called a good _____
    17. Even, to a poet
    18. Relating to sight
    19. *Author of the “The Feminine Mystique”
    21. *Woodstock site
    23. Mammoth excavation site, e.g.
    24. Youngster
    25. *____ and Dean
    28. Opposite of talker?
    30. Ultimate goal
    35. _ ___ course, as in college

  • Potato and purslane a great combination

    I was among friends last week, discussing the virtues of okra.  
    Some preferred to categorize the “slime” as a “thickening agent” while others insisted you need to be a wood pecker to eat one.  
    The little ones are best, of course, but often they get too big to be edible.  
    While okra is indeed a great thickening agent in gumbo and other quintessential southern dishes, there is another plant lurking in the garden that can do the same- and you can usually just find it growing along a path or in the flower garden.