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Today's News

  • Fatal Berry fire claims four lives, three houses

    An evergreen Christmas wreath sets among the charred remains of what was home to a Berry family. Now, all that remains in that location are the acrid smells of smoldering ashes and the reminder that four people lost their lives in a fire early Sunday morning.
    Virginia Nicole Pike and two of her four children, Cameron, 6, and Nicholas, 3, each one of a set of twins, and her cousin, Charles Tucker, perished in the fire.

  • Webster water line gushing

    Main water line break causes part of Webster Ave. to be closed down.
    From the Community Education Center “CEC” building to the crossing of Webster and Old Lair, the city has the road blocked off due to a main water line break.
    “We believe that it is either a 10 or eight inch pipe that has either split or has circumference damage,” said Gary Royalty, director of Public works/public utilities.
    At this time the type of damage or cause has not yet been declared.

  • Rape charge added to Webb’s growing list

    Accused murderer Bass Webb is back in the news this week with another indictment from a Harrison County grand jury.
    Webb, who is accused of murdering Bryia Runiewicz on July 31, 2009, just three days after his 30th birthday, is now being charged with first degree rape for the same day.
    The indictment, issued Tuesday, simply states, “[Webb] committed the offense of rape in the first degree by engaging in sexual intercourse with B.R. by forcible compulsion.”

  • News briefs

    Shelter Holiday Open House is Saturday
    Flora Shropshire Animal Shelter will be having its Christmas open house on Saturday, Dec. 11, from 1-3 p.m.
    Refreshment will be made available. Guests are asked to bring treats for the dogs and cats.

    Food Pantry in need of donations
    The Harrison County Food Pantry is located at 304 Locust St. (former Cynthiana Police Substation). It is open Wednesdays and Fridays from noon to 4 p.m.

  • OFFICIALS: Crews ready for Mother Nature’s winter fury

    The switch has been flipped from abnormally warm temperatures in November to a traditional white December in Harrison County. The local road departments say they are ready for what Mother Nature brings.
    If forcasted predictions are correct for this weekend and early next early next week, road crews’ readiness will be tested.
    “All the trucks are ready, and the salt bay is filled to the top,” said County Judge Executive Alex Barnett.

  • Supervisor retires after improvements at water plant

    He was responsible for cleaning the water plant and as of Dec. 1, he retired for a second time to enjoy more hunting and fishing.
    In 2006 Harry Johnson was brought out of a retirement that began in 2004 from Winchester Municipal Utilities. He was hired by the city to bring the Cynthiana Water Treatment plant up to code.
    “The plant was in trouble and being cited for numerous violations,” said Harry Johnson, water treatment plant supervisor
    Johnson described the general condition of the plant in 2006 to be neglected and misused.

  • Paws will help Humane Society programs

    Buy a paw to help decorate the Santa Paws Trees on display at the Animal House, Happy Tails, Brooks Animal Clinic, Harrison Vet Clinic, The Flower Box and Judy and Adkinson’s Flowers. Any and all donations appreciated and are tax deductible. Proceeds to benefit the Humane Society of Harrison County.

  • Laytart Christmas concert is Friday, Dec. 17

    ‘An Evening of Christmas Music’ will be presented by pianist Beth Laytart on Friday, Dec. 17 at 7 p.m. The concert will be held in the upstairs sanctuary of Cynthiana Presbyterian Church, corner of Main and Pleasant Sts. The church is handicapped accessible and has an elevator. The program will be a mixture of both sacred and secular holiday music.
    The concert is a fund-raiser for the Harrison County Senior Citizens’ Center, 216 Old Lair Road. The Center provides many service and activities for the residents of Harrison County and is in need of support.

  • Alternate learning promotes reading and math skills

    Sitting in a class room with flash cards and Gary Paulsen books is one way of teaching a fifth grader math and reading, but a field trip to the Extension Office to learn how to cook from local Homemakers works too.
     For the fourth year in a row, the Harrison County Cooperative Extension has teamed up with elementary schools to give the children and teachers a break from the classroom and have made it possible to learn core content from the kitchen.

  • How about a little help from my friends?

    Hello again to one and all. Sorry I missed writing last week’s column in Viewpoint.
    It was my week to write a column there, but I was still in a little trouble from the previous one that I had written about my wife.
    I have since been allowed to sleep in the house once again... just kidding.
    The real reason that I did not write a column in last week’s Viewpoint is real easy to explain... I simply had nothing to write about.
    I am still new to this job and have not yet made all the contacts that I need to in the county and city.