Today's News

  • Hearing loss causes vary; facts you should know

    (ARA) - When it comes to our health, many Americans have two realities: what we know and what we think we know. When what we think we know is less than accurate, it can be as harmful to our health as the things we don’t know at all. Perceptions about hearing loss are a good example of this phenomenon.

  • Tobin appointed director of Commodity Division for KFB

    David S. Beck, executive vice president of Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation, announced that Mike Tobin, a resident of Cynthiana, has been named director of the Commodity Division. His appointment is effective April 2, 2012.
    In this role, Tobin will serve as the organization’s liaison to the various agriculture commodity groups, agriculture agencies and work closely with KFB’s advisory committees that review policies and programs affecting the respective farm commodities.

  • Curves 14th annual Food Drive feeds hungry, waives joining fee

    Cynthiana Curves is joining the Curves Internation event to benefit food banks by offering a waiver of joining fee to new members and providing existing members a way to give back to their communities.

  • Charges filed in Cherokee Drive fire

    A Cynthiana man is in jail after a domestic situation became perilous early Tuesday morning.
    Michael King, 47, called police just before 1 a.m. to say that his wife had left him. Forty-five minutes later, he called back to 911 dispatch to report that his 125 Cherokee Drive home was on fire.
    When police arrived they found an apparently intoxicated King in front of his burning apartment.

  • Court OKs Brown EMS agreement

    The Harrison County Fiscal Court has voted to enter into a contract with Brown’s EMS for the remainder of the current court members’ terms.
    Representatives from Brown’s EMS were present at the March 13, fiscal court meeting to discuss long term plans for the ambulance service.
    Attorney Ed Culbertson and Joni Douglas provided the fiscal court with the ambulance service’s budget.

  • A family tradition

    By Ben Hyatt, News writer
    Life-long farmer Troy Bradford of Harrison County earned the Chamber of Commerce Farmer of the Year Award for 2011 by the sweat of his brow.
    In a small rural community like Harrison County, farmers are somewhat easy to find.
    Many go unnoticed due to the fact that they enjoy a simple life where large amounts of attention are seldom on their list of things to enjoy.

  • Local Tea Party aims at fiscal responsibility

    Radical may not be the right adjective to describe three of Harrison County’s active Tea Party members, but certainly they would like to see radical change in government spending and fiscal responsibility.
    Jim Pinson, Chuck Duffy and Darwin Root, members of the Harrison County Tea Party, said they are concerned about the federal deficit.
    “We’re a grass roots movement,” said Root. “There are several variations of the Tea Party out there.”

  • Faith in humanity restored by acts of kindness

    It often amazes me how people come together in order to help others.
    This past year and into 2012 has served as a testament to how groups of people will put their lives on hold in order to help pick someone up from hard times.
    Recently more tornadic weather caused several other families in Kentucky to be left homeless or even worse... without their loved ones.
    In 2011 several tornados swept across the southern part of the United States, killing hundreds and leaving thousands in piles of debris.

  • Students go hi-tech with iPads in the classroom

    Harrison County High School students are testing the pros and cons of using iPads in the classroom.
    Pencil and paper, hard-bound books and blackboards with chalk all have the same thing in common... outdated.
    As technology advances, school systems also improve their methods of relaying information to students through the use of technology.
    Ten Harrison County High School students, all of which are enrolled in TV Media during first period, are serving as a pilot group for iPads being used in the classroom.

  • Making laundry detergent

    Community Action’s Parent Group met Tuesday morning to make laundry detergent to show how to cut costs in the home.
    At right, Roberta Kinney, family service worker, and Melissa Mitchell, family service worker, help dip the liquid laundry detergent. From left, Jolyn England, Marie Brumley and Ashley Wills with Anton, talk about the recipe for the detergent as well as how to make homemade dryer sheets and baby wipes.