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Today's News

  • Museum Musings

    * Cynthiana Democrat, Feb. 15, 1945 -- “On Monday, while at the Cynthiana Stockyards, John Wheeler had the bad luck of receiving gashes on the leg from the tusk of a vicious hog. He said the attack was so sudden and swift that it was over before he had a chance to defend himself. His wounds were dressed at Harrison Memorial Hospital and he returned home.”
    * Cynthiana News, Jan. 7, 1869 -- Herman Rohs is about to establish a large coal yard near Pleasant Street on the railroad in this city.”

  • Growing herbs at home

    By Benita Peoples, County extension agent for family and consumer science
    In a botanical sense, an herb is a plant that does not produce a woody stem and dies back to the ground each winter to a perennial root system. In the garden sense, herbs are plants that serve as a major source of seasonings in food preparation. In an even broader sense, herbs include plants that are also useful for scents in cosmetics or for medicinal purposes. Some of them are woody and outstep the definition of a herbaceous plant.

  • Way Back When

    10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Aidan Tyler Morris, May 28, son of Craig and Jennet Morris.
    Construction begins on the Harrison County High School’s new tennis courts. The six new courts will be located above the football practice field at a cost of $186,500.
    Harrison Memorial Hospital welcomes Mark E. Einbecker, MD, to its staff. Einbecker is an orthopedic surgeon specializing in problems with the hand and upper extremities.
    Harrison County Sheriff’s Department nets $1.6 million in marijuana from air raid.

  • Reunions

    GILKERSON/GILKISON
    The Gilkerson/Gilkison family reunion will be held Saturday, Aug. 30 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Legion Hall on Legion Road in Paris, Ky. A potluck meal will be served at 12:30 p.m.
    Bring a covered dish, soft drinks. Utensils, plates, napkins, lemonade and coffee will be furnished. Also bring family tree information.
    For more information call Deloris G. Brooks at 859-987-4744 or Joyce G. Dean at 859-948-7064.

    MULLIGAN

  • Public hearing to set school tax rate is Sept. 10

    By Josh Shepherd, News writer

    Over a dozen community members attended the Harrison County School Board meeting Tuesday night to express concerns over the 2014-15 school budget proposal. They didn’t get much chance to talk about it.

  • Malen Clay Pierce

    Malen Clay Pierce was born to Larry and Jamie Pierce of Cynthiana on March 27, 2014 at Harrison Memorial Hospital.
    He weighed 7 lbs. 6 oz., and is welcomed by his sister Makayla Rees Pierce.
    Maternal grandparents are Jimmy and Laura Shields of Cynthiana; maternal great-grandparents are Bettye Marshall of Cynthiana and the late Harry Marshall, the late Malen and Lorena Shields of Mt. Olivet.

  • City appoints new E-911 director

    By Becky Barnes, Editor

    Some of the staffing issues that have plagued the E-911 dispatch are nearing a resolution, according to Cynthiana’s safety commissioner, Gary Brunker.

  • Memorial service planned for Ida Wright

    A memorial service will be held for Ida Wright, Cynthiana, who passed away on June 17, 2014, on Saturday, Sept. 6 at 12 p.m. at Hospice of the Bluegrass, U.S. 62 East.
    Parking available in the rear of the building.

  • Livestock losses may be recouped through FSA

    By Josh Shepherd, News writer

    The 2014 Farm Bill has opened the way for farmers to recoup some of their livestock losses due to weather calamities that have happened since October 2011.

  • The late summer lawn

    Summer splendor in the grass is being replaced by a fungus among us for some gardeners.
    I have seen some weird stuff out in the pastures this last week, likely due to the heat and rain. Mostly people like to blame dead patches in the lawn on grubs, but often fungal diseases are the culprit and the weather and our own maintenance habits contribute to the problem.  
    Despite the advice that fall is better than spring when it comes to fertilization, many people still do it which causes problems this time of the year.