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Today's News

  • Some Browns’ businesses are changing

    Two buildings owned by former mayor Jim Brown will soon be closing.

    The Oddville branch of Farmer’s National Bank will close Nov. 1, Brown’s wife Kay said.

    Kay Brown said the building is deteriorating and would cost more to repair than to build a new building in its place.

    “We’re going to tear the building down,” Brown said, adding that future plans include building a new Oddville branch in the same location.

  • HMH adds restrictions to visitors

    Harrison Memorial Hospital administration has posted signs restricting visitors to the obstetrics area to those over 18 years old.

    “Those babies don’t have any immunities yet,” said Sheila Currans, HMH administrator, adding that they are also asking anyone who has a suspicion of flu symptoms to refrain from visiting the hospital’s patients.

    “We hope people understand our need to do that,” Currans said.

  • Pay city tax bills by Nov. 30 to beat 20% penalty

    “The tax bills are due,” said Commissioner Mark Mattmiller at Tuesday evening’s city commission meeting.

    Mattmiller said the city has mailed the 2009 property tax bills and anyone not receiving a tax bill or receiving an incorrect tax bill should contact the city clerk’s office at 234-7150.

    Mattmiller said mortgage companies have honored those taxes being paid through escrow accounts and those residents will not receive a tax bill.

    Tax bills paid after Nov. 30 will face a 20 percent penalty, Mattmiller said.

  • Should lawmakers play doctor?

    One childhood Christmas memory is receiving a shiny red plastic doctor’s kit. I went from family member to family member looking inside their mouths while they played along with my fantasy career.

    I’m beginning to think that we are humoring a group of lawmakers who have no more qualifications to make a diagnosis than I did.

    In their fantasy careers, lawmakers believe they should go over the heads of experts to tell the public what’s best for their health care.

    I’m more than a little concerned.

  • Cooking school is Tuesday

    Don’t forget The Taste of Home Cooking School will be  held Tuesday at Harrison County High School auditorium. Doors will open at 5 p.m.  The show will begin at 7 p.m.

    The theme of this year’s event, which is a partnership venture with The Cynthiana Democrat, Cynthiana Lions Club and Ken’s NewMarket, is holiday cooking.

    Tickets may be purchased in advance for $9 at the Democrat office, Ken’s NewMarkets, the Harrison County Extension office or Granny’s Goodies.

  • Gabbard trial set for Jan. 12

    The man accused of killing Commonwealth Attorney Doug Wright in a June 8 car accident will stand trial Jan. 12.

    Daniel Gabbard faces charges of wanton murder, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol first offense and operating a commercial vehicle under the influence of alcohol first offense.

    According to a spokesperson with the Pendleton County Circuit Clerk’s office, Gabbard will appear for a pre-trial hearing on Dec. 18.

  • Winning her own battle with cancer, then the Race for the Cure 5K

    “I was never a runner,” Mandie Graham said.

    And so Mandie was a little surprised when she began running in May.

    “I just started running,” she said. “I built up my stamina.”

    While Mandie claims she never was a fast runner, she won first place Saturday, Sept. 26, at the Susan G. Koeman Race for the Cure 5K in Lexington.

    Mandie was the first cancer survivor to cross the finish line at 26 minutes and 25 seconds.

    “Are you kidding me?” Mandie asked when an official at the finish line told her the news.

  • ‘Teachers who retire cannot wait six months to get paid’

    To the editor:

    Having been a substitute teacher for 13 years, it was time to retire. My last day of work was in December 2008. The need for substitute teachers in January and February increased my desire to retire.

    As you know, the Kentucky legislators required all school personnel to contribute to a pension program. I did not want to participate in a pension program, but it was mandatory. However, when I retire, I would get my “contribution.”

  • Speeding on city streets; police enforce speed limits

    Leaves falling from trees onto city streets and rain do not make our streets very safe for a person who is speeding and is trying to stop. This makes for a very dangerous situation out here this time of year. Every driver needs to remember to adjust your driving habits to the road conditions because the roads are not going to adjust to your driving. Speed limits are posted for a reason and that is for people to drive safely in our community. They are not put out there for people to ignore.

  • City opts for 4 percent tax revenue increase

    City residents will soon receive their tax bills in the mail.

    According to city clerk Charleen McIlvain, tax bills will be sent to residents in a couple weeks.

    “You can compare the city to peoples’ households...” McIlvain said Tuesday morning. “The cost of service is rising a lot faster than revenues...”

    Last month, the Cynthiana City Commission approved and set the tax rates for this year.