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Today's News

  • It’s seed starting time again

    Starting seeds indoors turns out to be a necessary skill if you want success with early crops that prefer cooler temperatures during the growing season like cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts.  
    Setting out a young plant means it has a chance to reach maturity before our summer temperatures soar and the plants bolt and become bitter.   

  • CAIP approved for Harrison County, $230,000 in ag development funds

    The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board  approves $230,000 in Harrison County Agricultural Development Funds for a County Agricultural Investment Program (CAIP) at their January business meeting. The Harrison County Beef Cattle Association Inc. submitted a proposal to the Harrison County Agricultural Development Council and the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board to provide cost-share incentives to area farmers.

  • Mixed drink sales not quite ready to shake

    When the calendar rolls over to March next week, you won’t automatically be able to order a margarita at your favorite Cynthiana restaurant.
    There are still hoops through which restaurateurs must jump.
    The out-going Cynthiana City Commission voted in December to allow restaurants meeting certain requirements to sell mixed drinks. That, according to the approved ordinance, takes effect in March.
    However, before the first martini is shaken, there are permits and licenses to be garnered and fees to be paid.

  • Go Red

    Angie Walker had never had heart burn before. She didn’t know what was going on within her chest, but she knew it wasn’t right.
    “It felt like I was burning straight through to my back,” Walker said of the symptom that led up to her heart attack 15 months ago.
    The burning persisted for several days. It was the middle of the night when it became obvious to Angie that this was not a food-created burning. Her husband Jerry “was panicking like I was having a baby.”

  • Harrison man charged following school bus incident in Nicholas Co.

    A young Harrison County man is facing 38 felony counts of wanton endangerment as well as DUI and disregarding a stop sign after a near collision with a Nicholas County school bus Saturday night.
    According to Ptl. Mark Snedegar of the Carlisle Police Department, at about midnight, Dustin Lewis, 22, of Sadieville, left the Carnico Country Club with passenger Joe D. Ashbrook, 23, and swerved to avoid the school bus at the intersection of KY 36 and U.S. 68 after allegedly failing to stop.

  • Rotary bean soup luncheon is Friday

    The Cynthiana Rotary Club’s annual bean soup and corn bread luncheon will be held Friday at the Cynthiana Presbyterian Church beginning at 11 a.m.
    The luncheon, which benefits an orphanage in Haiti, is $6 for all you can eat. Serving will end at 2 p.m.
     

  • Construction begins next month for bridge

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet begin construction of the bridge replacement over Mill Creek and its approaches on White Oak Pike (KY 356) the beginning of March.
    During the early weeks, the contractor will do some preliminary work.  The real work will begin when Harrison County schools are dismissed for the summer. Once a date is determined, the bridge will be closed 90 days for the construction project. There will be a signed detour to use KY 36 and KY 1842 (White Oak Tricum).
     The construction project will be complete by Sept. 30, 2011.

  • ‘911. What is your emergency?’

    Local authorities say that children may be to blame for the high number of non emergency calls placed to 911 dispatch.
    Since it was implemented, 911 has helped save lives and homes from burning down to a pile of rubble. When a call is made to 911, the sirens come whaling and the officers or firefighters kick it into overdrive.
    With every good thing, though, comes a downside. Cynthiana Fire Department and Cynthiana Police Department are now pushing the Use It Don’t Abuse It  campaign to try and cut down on some of the unneeded calls that are made to E911.

  • Girls sell artwork to support children’s hospitals

    Amazing and blessed are two words that can be used to describe the gesture of two Harrison County girls, in their effort to help needy, sick children around Kentucky.
    Canned food drives, aluminum can drives or even Pennies from Heaven. All are efforts to raise money or goods to support a group that is often times in need.
    Elementary schools often try to teach young students the value and importance of taking care of those who need assistance and support. Often the idea of giving has to be taught to children.

  • Charges pending in alleged guardrail theft

    Harrison County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve McCauley said he thought he’d seen it all until he was called to a possible theft in progress Monday morning on U.S. 62 at Kendall Branch Road.
    McCauley worked an accident at that location the day before that left the guard rail damaged.