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Today's News

  • Escaped inmate captured in Boone County

    Becky Barnes,
    Editor
    bbarnes@cynthianademocrat.com

    Police captured an escaped prisoner on Tuesday afternoon after he had been on the run for about 24 hours.
    Gary W. Courtney, 49, who slipped custody at the Harrison County Justice Center Monday afternoon, was arrested in Boone County Tuesday following a brief foot chase, according to Harrison County Sheriff’s Deputy Dean Hutchison.

  • 9-1-1 What’s your emergency?

    Becky Barnes,
    Editor
    bbarnes@cynthianademocrat.com

    Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, without fail a call to 9-1-1 will get you the voice of a person trained for your specific need.
    The Cynthiana 9-1-1 dispatchers were honored last month as the Chamber of Commerce’s Public Safety Department of the Year.
    There is no such thing as a normal day behind the computer screens and telephones that link dispatchers to the public.
    There are, however, routine calls.

  • Burrell has made Cynthiana her home

    Lee Kendall,
    News Writer
    lkendall@cynthianademocrat.com

    Adolph Burrell met Mildred Clark while both in the US Army and soon were married. He was from a big city, Detroit,  and she was from rural Madison County, in Kentucky.
    After they started having children, Mildred left the military, but Adolph continued until he retired with 25 years of active-duty service.
    One of their five children, Jackie Burrell, has settled in Cynthiana and has been an active member of the community since moving here in 1992.

  • Local couple republish out-of-print books

    Lee Kendall,
    News Writer
    lkendall@cynthianademocrat.com

    If you can’t find a copy of that favorite children’s book you enjoyed when you were a child, chances are it is no longer in print.
    Locally owned and operated Purple House Press might just be able to help you find a copy of that long-lost book.
    The husband and wife team of Ray Sanders and Jill Morgan have been rescuing and reissuing those childhood favorites for 18 years.

  • Solar farm meeting draws questions from large crowd

    Lee Kendall,
    News Writer
    lkendall@cynthianademocrat.com

    About 200 people attended a public meeting last Thursday evening at the Extension Office concerning the proposed solar farm in western Harrison County.
    The meeting was sponsored by Geenex Solar, the company that intends to get the first large-scale solar operation in Kentucky up and running, in Harrison County.

  • P&Z forwards solar farm ordinance to county

    Lee Kendall,
    News Writer
    lkendall@cynthianademocrat.com

    On Monday night, the Cynthiana-Harrison County-Berry Joint Planning and Zoning Commission passed on to the Harrison County Fiscal Court, for its consideration, an amended ordinance dealing with solar energy systems.
    The ordinance requires solar farm applicants to procure a conditional use permit. It also specifies that solar farms must prepare a decommissioning plan, prior to the issuance of a building permit.

  • HCHS students excel at Music Festival

    On Saturday, 45 members of the Harrison County High School Band travelled to Lexington to participate in the Kentucky Music Educators Association District 7 Solo and Ensemble Festival. 
    This festival celebrates individual musicianship by giving students the opportunity to perform by themselves and in small groups. 
    “I am so proud of all the students who performed today,” said band director John Merz. “Over half of our band program was represented, and 15 students participated for the first time.” 

  • Cynthiana mayor gives ‘State of the City’ address at meeting

    Becky Barnes,
    Editor
    bbarnes@cynthianademocrat.com

    Cynthiana’s mayor has called for the commission to get behind him to bring a new utility to the city.

  • Mayor James Smith's State of the City address

    Good evening fellow commissioners, good evening citizens of the Maiden City.

  • This week in the State Capitol

    This week in Frankfort marked the halfway point of the 2018 Legislative Session. Kentucky is a robust state, with many incredibly good traits and some serious issues still to tackle.
    Every two years in Frankfort, the legislature is charged with crafting a budget to fund important government programs like education, health care and transportation, just to name a few. Every two years, Kentuckians descend on Frankfort to make the case for funding certain programs, and this year is certainly no different.