Today's News

  • Two of three cases dismissed

    A Cynthiana man was found not guilty of the misdemeanor charges filed against him last July.
    Gilbert Clark appeared before a Harrison County District Court jury on Friday to contest the five charges of alcohol intoxication, disorderly conduct, fourth degree assault, fourth degree attempted assault and resisting arrest.
    Cynthiana police arrested Clark on July 3 following an alleged fight at a family cook-out.
    The jury found Clark not guilty of all charges.

  • Hazardous duty retirement will be reinstated

    After reluctantly agreeing to table the issue of hazardous duty retirement for police and firefighters at the last meeting in January, safety commissioner Gary Brunker raised the issue again Tuesday.
    This time, with some degree of success.
    Two commissioners and the mayor agreed to reestablish hazardous duty retirement for all Cynthiana sworn police officers and firefighters effective July 1.

  • Former manager finds her home beneath Cynthiana’s ‘golden arches’

    After being gone for more than a year, Beverly Glover has said good-bye to Georgetown McDonalds and returned to a more familiar set of golden arches.
    “She received a standing ovation from everyone when she walked through the door,” said area supervisor Jim Bennett. “You get that feeling that everyone really respects and cares for Beverly.”
    Glover may not have the candy cane-colored socks that fit perfect with the bright yellow jumpsuit and shinny red hair, but she is just as big of a celebrity as Ronald McDonald.

  • News briefs

    Make a Blanket Day
    is Feb. 19
    Project Linus’ National Make a Blanket Day will be observed on Saturday, Feb. 19, at the First United Methodist Church in Georgetown beginning at 10 a.m.
    Between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., blankets will be made across the nation to help the organization with its mission to provide a warm blanket to each child who goes through some form of trauma.

  • County has 150 tons of salt for balance of winter, says judge

    There is still 150 tons of salt to carry the Harrison County Road Department through the remainder of the year.
    A harsh winter has many counties looking everywhere for good prices on rock salt, according to Harrison County Judge Alex Barnett.
    “Our county has done a terrific job in managing our salt contract so far,” said Barnett. “We are still using salt that we contracted for, which is keeping us from having to buy it at a tremendously higher rate.”

  • Machine technology teaches importance of precision

    You may have heard the expression “Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades,” but Machine Tool Technology could be added to the list.
    “Close” definitely counts in machining.
    Machinists regularly manufacture parts to specifications within one-ten-thousandths of an inch, or .0001 of an inch for those of you who prefer decimals.
    That’s about the size of a human hair that has been split 100 times.

  • Sports beat

    Defense and team play leads Breds over Deming Thursday 71-62
    The 38th District became more confusing Thursday night as the Harrison County Thorobreds travelled to Mt. Olivet and beat Deming 71-62.  
    Deming defeated Pendleton County last week and Pendleton County defeated Harrison County the week before which leads to the opinion that the district championship is up for grabs.  

  • Feeling your pain in my heart

    Being known as a religion writer, sometimes people write or call me to tell about their experiences with God.
    Sometimes they tell me of their theological ideas, which may or may not coincide with mine. Sometimes they tell of their own deep pain, past sin or present struggles.
    Around Christmas I found an envelope on my chair, marked “personal and private.” Hand-delivered and from a woman in the community, it contained a handwritten letter several pages long, written from the woman’s “prayer closet” during the early morning hours.

  • A Legislative Perspective on the Kentucky General Assembly

    The main portion of the 2011 Regular Session got underway early last week, and it didn’t take long for bills to begin making their way toward a full vote by the Kentucky House of Representatives.
    As you may know, odd-year meetings of the General Assembly are different than those in even-numbered years, which last for 60 rather than 30 days and are focused on adopting a budget.
    Short sessions traditionally begin by electing legislative leaders, appointing committees, recessing briefly and then returning in February for debating legislation.

  • Whiz Kids

    Whiz Kids tutoring and mentoring  program has launched at Eastside Elementary School.  There are several ways you can help and get involved in this community ministry:
    •Volunteer to be a tutor.
    •Sponsor a Whiz Kids tutoring bag for $10.
    •Provide snacks for the kids (approx. 15 kids).
    •Pray for the kids that will be tutored, their parents, the tutors and Whiz Kids leaders.
    For more information, contact the church office at 859-235-8449.