.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Welcoming Committee sets city-wide clean up as priority project for April

    When looking at the survey results from Harrison County Tomorrow, welcoming climate committee co-leader Pat Slade noticed one issue kept coming to the forefront.

    "Making our town better was described in two very common words, 'clean up,'" Slade said while reading a draft of a letter Monday night at the committee's meeting. "Just those two words were expressed and repeated at least 143 times."

    The committee is planning to host a community clean up for downtown Cynthiana.

  • Building to be safer when the next storm hits

    In "The Three Little Pigs" fairy tale, a big bad wolf huffs and puffs until he blows down the houses of two little pigs. After a tornado did to their house what the wolf did to the two little pigs houses, Dan and Betsy Haley of Cynthiana, Ky., are planning to take a lesson from the third little pig whose house the wolf could not blow down. They are going to rebuild a stronger home. Many techniques they will employ rely on research done by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) about how to build or retrofit homes for greater resistance to high winds.

  • Lions Club Auction begins with $51,000 goal

    In last year's 50th annual Lions Club Auction, the goal was to raise $50,000, which was met. So, it's only fitting that in its 51st year, the Lions Club would follow with a $51,000 goal.

    The annual Charity Auction will go on the air Monday, March 24, beginning at 6:30 p.m.

    Technology has changed the face of the former Lions Club Radio Auction. The audience is now both listeners and viewers.

  • Homeowner shoots intruder

    When Kevin Landrum yelled "Stop or I'll shoot," he meant it.

    Landrum and his wife Debbie and 23-month-old son Carson arrived at their Old Lair Road home Sunday evening about 9:15 after a dinner with friends. What they found shattered their lives and all that they had found comfortable.

    When the couple pulled in the driveway, they could tell that things were not right, but didn't really put it all together until they bridged the gapping door between the garage and their house.

    Kevin turned to Debbie and said "We've been robbed."

  • Revised net profit tax passes first reading

    The Harrison County Fiscal Court approved the first reading of the ordinance streamlining the occupational and net profits tax, including a $15,000 gross income threshold on taxing rental properties.

    The move comes after the court has gone back and forth, discussing if and how to place a threshold or exemption on the previously untaxed area.

    Tax administrator Melody Wright gave a presentation to magistrates demonstrating how different tax returns would lend to different net profits owed.

  • Other help available to victims

    Those affected by the Feb. 6 storms - either by the tornado, straight line winds, severe storms or flooding - have several options for help.

    The U.S. Small Business Association (SBA) is offering low-interest disaster physical damage loans for homes, personal property and non-farm businesses in the areas declared as disasters since the storms.

    Michael Peacock, communications specialist for SBA, said the loans are for uninsured and underinsured losses as a result of the storms.

  • Feds lend a helping hand

    Harrison County residents affected by the Feb. 6 storms are now receiving help from the federal government.

    A Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) opened Monday in the parking lot next to the Harrison County Sheriffs office.

    Harrison is one of six counties added last week to the original nine declared eligible for federal assistance.

    Federal disaster assistance can include grants for short-term rental needs, for homeowners to make repairs and for a variety of other disaster-related expenses.

  • FEMA offers answers to common myths, rumors

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Securitys Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Kentuckys Division of Emergency Management (KYEM) said in the first few weeks following a disaster, those affected may be misled by half-truths and rumors.

    State and federal disaster recovery officials said there are two easy ways to begin the application process. You may call FEMAs toll-free number, 800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 800-462-7585 for the hearing- and speech-impaired. Both numbers are available from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time, seven days a week until further notice.

  • Brown reports

    "The city continues to look good from a financial standpoint," Cynthiana Mayor Jim Brown said in his "state of the city address" on Tuesday.

    He commended commissioners for staying within their operating budgets and identified specific areas where the city progressed over the last year.

    He said the city made water system improvements which amounted to $793,720. Grant monies amounted to $230,000. The city picked up the balance.

  • Burglary suspect shot Sunday night

    The investigation into a Sunday night shooting and its relation to numerous burglaries along Old Lair Road is continuing.

    Det. Paul Olin of the Harrison County Sheriff's Department said the initial call was made at about 9:30 p.m. Sunday for a burglary that had occurred on Old Lair Road.

    While law enforcement was on their way to the burglary, a second call came in that shots had been fired at the same residence.

    Thomas Perysian, 26, of Paris, was allegedly shot by the homeowner, Kevin Landrum, who interrupted the burglary of his home.