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Today's Features

  • Avery Katheryn Slucher was born to Jakob and Virginia Slucher on Jan. 16, 2015 at Harrison Memorial Hospital.
    She weighed 6 lbs. 12 oz., and is welcomed by her brother Brantley Slucher.
    Maternal grandparents are Tressie Faulkner of Cynthiana, Ky. and Jerry Faulkner of Berry, Ky.; maternal great-grandparents are Adrian and Georgia Faulkner and the late Donald and Martha Brown.
    Paternal grandparents are Steve and Cathy Slucher of Cynthiana; paternal great-grandparents are Mary Carr and the late Martin Carr, Faye Slucher and the late Hugh Slucher.

  • 10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Destinei Mae Hutchison, March 4, daughter of Amber Hutchison; Allie Elizabeth Jacobs, Jan. 19, daughter of Marty and Amy Jacobs.
    Harrison County Fiscal Court members discuss takeover of Griffith farm on US 62 W and extends Handy House committee deadline. University of Kentucky professor Phil Crowley asks that the county consider ownership of the Griffith Farm property. Right now, UK owns the travern house and 1.6 acres of the farm. Further discussion will take place at the next meeting.

  • * 1950 Telephone Directory -- “RCA Victor Television -- Exciting Television Fun Year In and Year Out -- RCA Victor gives big 52 square inch eye witness television -- Sales and Service -- Adams & Moore, 111 S. Main. Phone 354.”
    * Cynthiana News, Aug. 15, 1867 -- “Mr. J. M. Smith, the proprietor of the Livery Stable on Pleasant Street, authorizes us to say that the report that he had difficulty with one Wilhite on Walnut Street is false.”
    * Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) -- “If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?”

  • The Harrison County Extension Office will be offering a pasture meeting on Monday, March 9 beginning at 7 p.m. The program will be conducted in the large meeting room at the Extension Office.
    I am sure folks are beginning to wonder if we still have grass pastures under the snow covered fields. As the weather begins to change it is important to be prepared. We must  be ready to  make quick applications of soil amendments and seed before we get that quick flush of growth in spring. We will also discuss alfalfa seeding as a way to improve hay and pasture production.

  • The previously scheduled tobacco meeting has been rescheduled for Wednesday, March 18 at 6 p.m. at the Harrison County Extension Office. Bob Pearce, will be here to discuss the current situation and will also offer an updated GAP training. We will have a dinner and meeting so please call 859-234-5510 if you plan to attend.

  • Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announces that a one-time extension will be provided to producers for the new safety-net programs established by the 2014 Farm Bill, known as Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC).The final day to update yield history or reallocate base acres has been extended one additional month, from Feb. 27, 2015 until March 31, 2015. The final day for farm owners and producers to choose ARC or PLC coverage also remains March 31, 2015.

  • The weather we have faced this past month had an impact on everyone in the state of Kentucky. Many farmers throughout our region of the U.S. were in the middle of calving and faced extreme measures to keep their cattle safe and see them through the worst conditions we have experienced in several years. Many farmers are familiar with the 2014 Farm Bill programs for grain crops and have been working to update information and select a program that best fits their farm.

  • It was in the early 80’s, I had just left the teenager years, I was back in California after two years in the Army, and I was a father of a beautiful little girl named Jyll.

  • Here’s the dichotomy: One of the things I love most about God is also the thing I hate most.

  • We have been trudging about in shin-deep snow for days now and the subzero temperatures have kept us on our toes as we try to keep livestock out of the wind and supplied with hay and water.
    Snow has an insulating effect, which is particularly useful when we do have frigid temperatures.  
    Ground level snow will actually protect the roots and crowns of perennial and woody plants but you may notice a little burn above the snow level when it comes to broadleaf evergreens.