.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Ecklar will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary on Friday, Aug. 11.
    They were married at home by the Rev. Ed Claybrook.

  • CITY ON A HILL
    City on a Hill will present a gospel sing on Saturday, Aug. 5 at 6 p.m. at the Harrison County Community Action Center, Old Lair Road. Everyone is welcome to come and worship with us. A free dinner will be served after the program.
    • • • •
    City on a Hill evening services are held on Wednesdays at 7 p.m.; Sunday services are at 10:30 a.m. and at 6 p.m.
    Services are held at the Center at 201 N. Second St., Berry, Ky.
    For more information call 859-954-1573 or 859-954-0579.

    LIVING FREE OF

  • By Benita Peoples, County extension agent for family and consumer science
    Do you have a son or daughter who is college bound this fall? Prior to heading off to college, it is important that students have a basic understanding of money management skills.
    For many students, college may be the first time they have been responsible for managing their own money. Even if mom and dad are paying all of the bills, they will not be around to help their child make everyday spending decisions.

  • Many of us have gone through turbulent times in our marriage but by working together, communicating and compromising we are able to mend the hurts. Our vows should mean something, not just say so as to be married. Remember the wedding lasts 30 minutes but the marriage is forever.
    Ephesians 5:25 says, “Husbands love your wives, just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her.”
    Last year in Jackson, Mississippi, a newspaper reported about a man whose wedding ring saved his life.

  • 10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Thomas Wayne Ballinger, July 2, son of Tomas S. and Heather R. Ballinger; Madelyn Ann Carson, July 6, daughter of Heather and Nicholas Carson; Samuel Canaavan Wayne Click, May 25, son of Sidney Allen Click and Amy Rene Thomas.

  • Today I have the heebie jeebies.
    I’ve been listening to a podcast (that’s like a radio program that you download from the Internet) about fear: Why are people afraid? How can they get rid of fear?
    The podcast began with a story about woman with Urbach-Wiethe disease, a rare condition that has three symptoms: a scratchy voice, raised dots around the eyes and absolutely no sense of fear.
    The part of her brain that registers fear is calcified. She can be happy, sad, angry, feel love and feel hate, but she can’t feel fear.

  • Family members of people buried in the historic Barlow Methodist Church Cemetery on Barlow Pike have formed a non profit Kentucky corporation for the preservation of the cemetery grounds.
    The Barlow Methodist Church was formally organized in 1866.  It is thought that a church and a school met on the grounds prior to the Civil War.  With changing demographics the church was closed over a decade ago.  In 2015, the building was torn down as siding materials contained asbestos.

  • MYNEAR
    The Mynear family reunion will be held Saturday, Aug. 5,  in the Hunter Shelter at Blue Licks State Park and Resort from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Bring food, drinks, and eating utensils for a noon potluck meal.
    Come and bring family and friends. All are welcome.

  • 10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Alarra Blaine Mateace and Airsiah Jade Venae Cobbins, July 13, born to Cartia Cummins and Larry Cobbins; Kathryn Marie Wilson, July 6, daughter of Kevin and Rebekah Wilson.
    Harrison County City Cab now is service. Bill Cummins and Barry Martin are the owners/chauffers.
    Sophomore Courtney Grannis is the first female to take the field as a Thorobred football player.

  • We cannot control the weather but we can control what our tomatoes eat, so to speak.
    At planting time, we prepare the soil with composted hen manure and a little organic fertilizer. We also mulch around the plants immediately in order to moderate soil moisture and to prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases.   
    This year our work at building healthy soil has paid off because the tomatoes are thriving. Some folks have not been as lucky as the rain poured down earlier in the season.