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Today's Features

  • It’s time to start it all over again, thank goodness!
    I had to buy some potatoes from the grocery a few weeks back because we had finally finished all that were stored in the basement.    
    Home grown potatoes, even the old ones in their slightly shriveled state, are far superior than the kind that come in a plastic bag.  
    I am really ready to get my hands in the soil and planting potatoes is just the thing to get the season rolling.

  • Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announces comprehensive outreach efforts are underway to assess damage and assist rural Midwest and Southern communities in the wake of recent deadly storms.
    “These storms struck the very heart of rural America,” said Vilsack. “USDA regional and local staff members are on the front lines, have worked each day since the storms hit, and for many it’s personal: they live and work alongside the victims. I’ve directed our expertise and resources be put to the fullest possible use.”

  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) invites minority farmers and ranchers in Harrison County and across the nation to voluntarily join the USDA Minority Farm Register to receive information and opportunities from USDA agencies.

  • USDA officials learned that fraudulent letters are being sent by FAX to individuals and businesses in at least four states. The letters purportedly come from a USDA procurement officer and seek personal information. These letters are false and in no case should a recipient respond with personal and financial information.

  • All this past week I’ve been talking to people with scars for a series of stories that I wrote for the newspaper where I work.
    I got the idea from a photographer I heard on the radio, talking about a series of photos he had done of people’s scars.
    He said that every scar tells a story.
    When I was 9, I bent down to say “hi” to Sam Lang’s Basset hound and it jumped up and bit my face, tearing a hole from the right edge of my lip to my chin.

  • THURSDAY, March 22
    Women’s Book Group. Thursday, March 22 at 6 p.m. at the Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library. The book for discussion will be Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World by Vicki Myron.
    FRIDAY, March 23
    Bookmobile. The Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library Bookmobile will be available March 23 at New Beginnings at 10:30 a.m.; Robynwood Heights, 3 p.m.
    SATURDAY, March 24

  • Kelsey Samara Leadingham and Robert Austin Dacci, together with their families, announces their engagement.
    Leadingham is the daughter of Becky-Adkins Leadingham of Lexington, and Steven Franklin Leadingham of Winchester. She is a graduate of George Rogers Clark High School, and a May 2009 graduate of Eastern Kentucky University with a Bachelors degree in Broadcasting and Electronic Media. She is employed by Insight Media in Lexington as a Television Production Specialist.

  • * Cynthiana News, June 20, 1867 - “The races last Saturday in Paris were, as we learn from those who were present, very interesting. Quite a crowd was present. In the first race A.J. Hook’s horse beat W.W. Abbott’s horse. In the second race, Mr. Andrews distanced the whole party. In the third race, Wyatt entered a bay mare by Abdallah, and Abbott a bay mare by Abdallah. Abbot’s mare won the first heat.”

  • By Cheryl Case, Co. ext. agent
    Herbs and spices have been used in foods for centuries. It has been reported that in 1492 when Columbus sailed the ocean blue, he did so in order to reach the rich herbs and spices of the Orient. Join us on Tuesday, March 27 at 1 p.m. at the Harrison County Extension Office for Growing and Cooking with Herbs. Jennifer Howard, Clark County Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Science, will share how to grow an herb garden, how to make herbal vinegars, provide hints for using herbs in foods and taste testing.