Today's Features

  • THURSDAY, Feb. 22
    Harrison County Go Red Celebration. The annual Go Red Celebration will be held at the Harrison County Extension Office on Feb. 22. The speaker will be Dr. B.K. Srivastava, HMH Cardiologist. The event begins at 5:15 p.m., with the speaker presenting at 6:15 p.m. A light dinner will be provided, and must RSVP by Feb. 19 to the Harrison County Extension Office at 859-234-5510.

  • 10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Brooklynn Marie French, Jan. 28, daughter of Darren and Shanna French.
    Twenty-three persons have applied for the school leader post of superintendent. Selection will be announced on April 4.

  • * Historian George Slade (1916-2005) -- “I remember when Biancke’s Restaurant menu, in addition to other delicacies, listed for breakfast hog brains scrambled with eggs, for lunch cold slided beef tongue sandwiches, and for dinner lamb fries with cream gravy.” (2018 - Congratulations and thanks to Mary Todd and all. Rest assured that today’s delicacies are most satisfactory.)

  • It is almost May and plans are already being made for the second annual Paris Storytelling Festival. The Festival will take place in Paris and Carlisle the weekend of May 11-13 and the lineup is sure to please everyone.
    Back by popular demand is storyteller Bil Lepp from West Virginia. Last year he had the Bourbon County Middle and High School roaring in their seats, as well as the listeners at the Wallis House Garden Club, the Bourbon County Courthouse and the First Christian Church.

  • It is that time of year again and I am reminded because of the smell and road kill left behind. Plus, a strong scent of skunk has been lingering in the pasture this past week; and I got an Instagram video from my niece as she was clearly backing away from a lumbering black and white rodent down by the river!  We used to get them circling the house on winter evenings but our livestock guardian dogs’ presence has kept them from bay the last few years.  Their presence is not surprising, however, because it is mating season for skunks and they are on the move!

  • The annual Harrison County Homemakers International Dinner will be held Monday, March 25, at 6 p.m. at the Extension Office.
    Kelsey Knight will present a program about her year in Ghana. She will talk about working in a local middle school, working with farmers and her 4-H Club.
    She will also have some products she brought home, such as fabric, money, and beads that she collected in Ghana.
    The dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. and is open to the public. Guests are asked to bring a covered dish and enjoy the evening’s fellowship.

  • By Jessica Sayre, County extension agent for Horticulture
    There is no surer sign of spring than blooming gardens and flower beds, but what happens behind-the-scenes to get them to that point?
    Much of the work goes in before you even break the soil. Before you dig in, it’s important to choose the proper site, plan what you will be growing, and prepare the soil to yield the best possible results. A garden is nothing without a good foundation, making it extra important to choose the correct site.

  • The MSUCorps AmeriCorps Program and its partners are gearing up for their eighth annual Morehead Build-A-Bed Project to provide beds to children who are living in homes with not enough beds or none at all.
    The goal is to give beds to children PK-12th grade who are forced to sleep on floors, couches, or in beds with multiple other children or family members. This regional Build-A-Bed Project has provided more than 1,000 beds to children in Eastern Kentucky since it began in 2010. This year the committee set a goal to build 250 beds.

  • 10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Lesley Shawn May, Nov. 28, daughter of Scott and Amanda May; Shasta Jalene Kelly, Dec. 12, daughter of Ashley Kelly; Arabel Lesley Anderson, Jan. 24, daughter of Matt and Valerie Anderson; Meredith Danielle Vaughn, Oct. 31, daughter of Dixie Davidson and Andrew Vaughn.
    Harrison County schools close for sickness. Doctors confirm that the flu was behind the 326 absences.

  • I was just thinking about spring but then I realized I should just live in the moment and be thankful that I do not have to battle weeds this time of the year.
    Spring and cool season weeds will be here soon enough. The most common cool-season annual and perennial weeds will be germinating once our soils warm a bit, it is amazing how quickly it can happen as our days get longer and the sun shines more frequently.