.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • CLASS OF 1992
    The Harrison County High School Class of 1992 will hold its 20th reunion on Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Cynthiana Country Club from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m.
    The cost is $30 per couple or $20 individual. Cost includes finger foods and music.
    For questions, please contact Todd Probus at tprobus@yahoo.com, 859.494.4276, or join the “HCHS Class of 1992 20th Reunion” page on Facebook.

  • CALVARY ASSEMBLY
    Youth revival will be held Wednesday-Friday, Aug. 22-24 at 7 p.m. nightly at Calvary Assembly, 325 Webster Ave., across from the high school. Speaker will be Rodney Goodlett. All youth are invited for special singing, worship, pizza, games, and fun times with friends.
    Bud Gauze is the youth pastor. For more information call 234-4646 or visit www.calvaryshill.net.

    CORNERSTONE
    ASSEMBLY FULL GOSPEL

  • When people ask me what I do at my job at the newspaper, specifically what topics I write about, I tell them the shorthand version: old people, dead people and God.
    Actually, I cover a lot more than that, but those three — old people, dead people and God — are the three areas that seem to fall to me.
    This past week I wrote stories about four people who had died, and only one of them I would consider old.
    Of those four people, I attended three memorial services. As I write this, I have two services to attend in the coming week.

  • THURSDAY, Aug. 23

  • Many vegetables and fruits are now ready for harvesting, and many gardeners will have more produce than they can readily eat. Those who want to preserve fresh, summer foods for later consumption will consider either freezing or canning the harvest. But is one way of preservation better than the other? The answer depends on the type of food you want to preserve. 
    If proper techniques and correct temperatures are used, frozen foods retain greater amounts of their vitamin content, natural color, flavor and texture.

  • I was among friends last week, discussing the virtues of okra.  
    Some preferred to categorize the “slime” as a “thickening agent” while others insisted you need to be a wood pecker to eat one.  
    The little ones are best, of course, but often they get too big to be edible.  
    While okra is indeed a great thickening agent in gumbo and other quintessential southern dishes, there is another plant lurking in the garden that can do the same- and you can usually just find it growing along a path or in the flower garden.  

  • The Department for Public Health (DPH) reports that  cantaloupes tested in the state public health laboratory carry the same strain of Salmonella associated with a statewide outbreak that health officials say is still ongoing.

  • By Gary Carter, Co. ext. agent
    Many of the fields in Harrison County and also other counties in Central Kentucky look good. The one exception is the corn has no grain.
    Many of the fields grew normally early in the season.  When the extreme dry and hot weather occurred corn was attempting to develop and ear and receive pollen. With the extreme weather, little or no grain fill formed and we now have corn stalks with limited grain.