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Today's Features

  • * Log Cabin, May 26, 1889 -- “Gus Berry charged with throwing rocks at Dover Coleman’s house was fined $5 and costs for breach of peace. A $100 peace bond was also required of him in default of which he was sent to jail.”

  • The Cynthiana Chapter of the DAR met at Duncan Tavern on June 8.
    Jayne Newman introduced Mariah Evans, KSDAR Registrar. She gave a tour and orientation of what the John Fox Jr. Library has to offer for genealogy research.
    The new Regent, Gail Kesterson, called the meeting to order.
    The DAR Ritual, Pledge of Allegiance, American’s Creed, and the Preamble were recited, followed by singing of the Star Spangled Banner.

  • Haley Dawn Fauste, a eighth grade student at Harrison County Middle School, has earned a position on the Kentucky state/provincial National Junior High rodeo team and will be traveling with fellow teammates to Gallup, N.M., June 23-29, to compete at the ninth annual National Junior High Finals Rodeo (NJHFR) in thebarrel racing, pole bending, team roping and ribbon roping goat tying competitions.

  • At the 2012 State Fair, the Harrison County Land Judging Team was named the 2012 KY State Land Judging Team.  
    The four members of that team are Joseph Bush, Justin Barnes, Tommy Vallandingham, and Austin Bradford.  
    Bush has been a member of the Land Judging Team for nine years and also earned the fourth highest individual score at the Kentucky state competition.  
    Barnes has been a member of the team for five years, Vallandingham a three-year member, and Bradford was competing for the first year, with all individuals receiving a blue ribbon.

  • By Vickie Fryman, guest columnist

  • I value the guardian behavior of our animals as one is charged to protect the other.  
    We have house cats that are free to go outside; barn cats that mostly hang out in the garage; a companion red heeler mutt who rarely leaves my side; and a Maremma livestock guardian dog (LGD).  Baxter, the LGD, has challenged our thinking in owning dogs.  
    He has reinforced that animals follow their instinct above all else.
    He is not a pet, rather a worker that is a critical component to keeping our farm alive.

  • The Kentucky Industrial Hemp Commission unanimously elected Harrison County farmer Brian Furnish as its new chairman at the close of its meeting on Thursday after Agriculture Commissioner James Comer stepped aside in compliance with Senate Bill 50, industrial hemp legislation that is set to take effect at the end of the month.

  • This year several farmers are doing a great job of rotating corn fields to soybean fields. No-till is an excellent practice because we take care of weed and disease problems with crop rotation. Only one problem, someone forgot to tell the slugs.
    The residue from last year’s corn crop is a perfect environment for slugs to live and thrive while consuming young soybean plants for their evening meal. While we continue to have moist and cool conditions, slugs will continue to thrive.