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Today's Features

  • A few weeks ago I got a letter from a woman in Louisiana who had read one of my books.
    Sometimes when you write books people think you know stuff, that you have special wisdom and answers to their problems.
    I’ll let you in on a secret: We don’t, at least I don’t. I can put words together and make them sound pretty and sometimes I have a thought or two that may or may not be helpful to some people, but mostly I think that I don’t.

  • CYNTHIANA
    PRESBYTERIAN
    The annual Souper Bowl of Caring project collected money and cans of soup for the Harrison County Food Pantry.  This was collected by the Youth group on Super Bowl Sunday.  The youth gathered Wednesday after school to deliver the items to the Food Pantry along with Pastor Patrick Laney.
    This is an event to utilize Super Bowl weekend to mobilize youth to fight hunger and poverty in their local communities.

  • Mr. and Mrs. Harley Trogdlen of Owensboro, Ky., announce the engagement of their daughter, Haley Christine Trogdlen, to James Mason McCauley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Scott McCauley of Cynthiana, Ky.
    Trogdlen is a graduate of Owensboro High School, Transylvania University and the University of Kentucky College of Law. She is employed as a law clerk for the United States courts.
    McCauley is a graduate of Harrison County High School and Transylvania University. He is employed as a loan officer with PBI Bank in Lexington, Ky.

  • If you like digging in the dirt, come to the Paris-Bourbon County Library on Saturday, April 2 at 1 p.m. Karen Angelucci, Master Gardener, will speak on her many successes and failings at gardening and discuss her new book, Grimy Grubby Gardening. This event is free and open to the public; advance reservations are not required.

  • Everyone is invited to create an “edible book,” and enter it in a contest. The only rules are it must be edible and must be somehow related to a book.
    What is an edible book? It’s made of something you can eat and it looks like a book or makes reference to a book title or structure.

  • The Women’s Club of Harrison County met at the Cynthiana Country Club on March 11. The Pledge to the flag was led by Virgie Wells, president.
    The blessing and Spiritual Values was given by Lottie Barlow. She read the story about the groundhog and also read a poem ‘The Daffodils.’
    The program, which was to be given by Michelle Coe Foley, was cancelled do to a sickness in the family. Music was provided by Beth Laytart.
    There were two guest at the meeting, Sherry Copes and Tammy Schweitzer.

  • As a result of our Homemaker lesson last year on Know Your Elected Officials, Linda Herrington organized a trip to Frankfort.

  • * Log Cabin, Nov. 25, 1905 -- Advertisement -- “A passenger and express wagon is being run between Cynthiana and Claysville every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday by Mr. A. J.  Cooper. Passengers, etc. solicited.”
    * Cynthiana Democrat, March 10, 1932 -- “Cynthiana Board of Education reduces salaries of all teachers and other employees of school system.”

  • 10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: John Taylor Grayson, Feb. 21, son of Matt and Sandra Grayson; Noah Patrick Westfall, Jan. 26, son of Lori Westfall Hutchison; Jacob Allan Riley, March 5, son of Regina Wagner and Allan Riley; Sheridan Catherine Dawn Jones, March 9, daughter of Katrina Jones; Alex Ricardo Sanchez, March 8, son of Jennifer Aubrey and Moises Sanchez.
    John S. Oldham Jr., M.D. to hold an open house to celebrate the opening of his new office located in the Harrison Memorial Professional Arts Building.

  • Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms, tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds, according to Michael Palmer, Harrison County’s Emergency Management director, who offered the following information for tornado preparedness.
    A tornado appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles per hour. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long. Every state is at some risk from this hazard.