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Today's Features

  • THURSDAY, Aug. 23

  • Many vegetables and fruits are now ready for harvesting, and many gardeners will have more produce than they can readily eat. Those who want to preserve fresh, summer foods for later consumption will consider either freezing or canning the harvest. But is one way of preservation better than the other? The answer depends on the type of food you want to preserve. 
    If proper techniques and correct temperatures are used, frozen foods retain greater amounts of their vitamin content, natural color, flavor and texture.

  • I was among friends last week, discussing the virtues of okra.  
    Some preferred to categorize the “slime” as a “thickening agent” while others insisted you need to be a wood pecker to eat one.  
    The little ones are best, of course, but often they get too big to be edible.  
    While okra is indeed a great thickening agent in gumbo and other quintessential southern dishes, there is another plant lurking in the garden that can do the same- and you can usually just find it growing along a path or in the flower garden.  

  • The Department for Public Health (DPH) reports that  cantaloupes tested in the state public health laboratory carry the same strain of Salmonella associated with a statewide outbreak that health officials say is still ongoing.

  • By Gary Carter, Co. ext. agent
    Many of the fields in Harrison County and also other counties in Central Kentucky look good. The one exception is the corn has no grain.
    Many of the fields grew normally early in the season.  When the extreme dry and hot weather occurred corn was attempting to develop and ear and receive pollen. With the extreme weather, little or no grain fill formed and we now have corn stalks with limited grain.

  • I am getting ready to head back to U of L where I teach two courses so I really need to get organized.
    The garden is still producing and time needs to be spent on turning some of the bounty into things that can be enjoyed during the winter months.  
    I have had the dehydrator going everyday this last week drying apples, peaches and berries, cherry tomatoes and potatoes.  
    Plus, predictions of rising food costs (ironically current reports indicate that grain and sugar prices are affecting prices now and I don’t eat much of that).

  • By: Nancy Kennedy
    I suffer from a chronic disease and recently had a flare up, albeit a mild one.
    I’m a hypochondriac, and in my case the disease manifests itself as anxiety. It started shortly after my husband had open-heart surgery six years ago this month. An elephant came and sat on my chest and refused to budge, and then strange, random twinges started twinge-ing and I could feel my heart beating, which is normally a good thing, except when I paid close attention to it, it would beat faster, which scared me, which made it beat even faster.

  • CALVARY ASSEMBLY
    Missionary David Parks will be speaking at Calvary Assembly on Sunday, Aug. 12 at 10:45 a.m. He formerly started churches in Azerbaijan and is now going to start churches in Great Britain. Calvary Assembly is located at 325 Webster Ave.
    Youth Service Sunday, Aug. 19 at 10:45 a.m. at Calvary Assembly under the leadership of Bud Gauze, Youth Pastor, the youth will lead the entire service. This will include worship, speaking, special music and drama.
    For more information call 234-4646 or visit www.calvaryshill.net.

    HOUR OF

  • THURSDAY, Aug. 16
    Harrison County Historical Society. Thursday, Aug. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library. Kentucky Monthly’s Amanda Hervey will be discussing her new book Kentucky A to Z: A Bluegrass Travel Memoir which features Oddville. This program is presented by the Harrison County Historical Society.
    FRIDAY, Aug. 17
    Bookmobile. The Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library Bookmobile will be available Friday, Aug. 17 at Our Little Miracles at 10:30 a.m.; Robynwood, 3 p.m.
    SATURDAY, Aug. 18