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Today's Features

  • Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library hosted a Pirate and Play Dough Party on Thursday Sept. 20. Over 30 children came to hear pirate stories, decorate pirate hats, get a tattoo, fish for a snack, and go on a treasure hunt. For information on upcoming programs for all ages contact the library at 234-4881 or visit our website at www.cynthianalibrary.org.

  • CLASS OF 1977
    The Harrison County High School Class of 1977 will hold their 35 year reunion on Sept. 29 from 7:30 p.m.-12 a.m. at the Elks Club.
    For more information call 234-9380.

    CLASS OF 1964
    The Harrison County High School Class of 1964 is getting ready for their annual reunion. This year it will be on Oct. 20 at Biancke’s Restaurant. If you come for dinner, we will be in the back room at 5 p.m. We’ll order from the menu and everybody will pay for their own meal.

  • Lukas Leroy Price was born to Chad and DeeAnna Price of Cynthiana on Aug. 16, 2012 at Harrison Memorial Hospital.
    He weighed 8 lbs. 10 oz., and is welcomed by his brothers, Blake and Dylan Price.
    Maternal grandparents are Odus and Reba Fryman of Cynthiana; maternal great-grandparents are Virginia Jones and the late Gilbert Jones and the late Odus and Arphia Fryman.

  • The Cynthiana Chapter of the DAR met at the Cedar Ridge Health Center on Sept. 15.
    Regent Melinda Rawlings called the meeting to order and welcomed guests and speaker Rogers Barde.
    The DAR Ritual, the Pledge of Allegiance, and the American’s Creed were recited, followed by singing of the Star Spangled Banner.
    Rogers Barde from the John Fox Jr. Library in Paris gave a most informative talk on how to research your Revolutionary ancestor, how to document, and how to fill out the necessary papers in order to join the DAR.

  • The Women’s Club of Harrison County met at the Cynthiana Christian Church  on Sept. 14. Judy McKinley gave the lunch blessing.
    After lunch Anna Ruth McLoney introduced Cindy Hill. She provided the music on the guitar. The members also sang patriotia songs.

  • THURSDAY, Sept. 27
    Women’s Group. The women’s group will be reading Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg. The group will meet Thursday, Sept. 27 at 6 p.m. at the Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library Annex. Refreshments will be served the night of discussion.
    FRIDAY, Sept. 28
    Bean Soup Supper will be held Friday, Sept. 28 from 5-9 p.m. at Cynthiana Christian Church. Cost of the meal will be $6 and includes bean soup, country ham and a drink.

  • There are many things that come together that allow plants to thrive.  
    When it comes to plants native to our area, we are not required to go to great extremes to provide the ideal environment.
    An ideal environment, however, means a great many different things depending on what kind of plant you are.
    This time of the year we can do a couple of things for some favorite flowering plants.  

  • The farm field day in Harrison County will be held at the farm of Mike and Shelley Meyer on Monday, Oct. 8 at 5 p.m. The farm is located on Highway 32 or Connersville Pike, four and one-half miles from Highway 27.
    The Meyer’s have a beef production farm with corn, hay and tobacco production as well. The farm is going through some major changes at the present time and producers will get to see many of the improvements which will aid in future operations.

  • With the start of fall comes the risk of cyanide poisoing in ruminants. Cyanide, prussic acid, hydrogen cyanide or hydrocyanic acid poisoning are all terms describing the same condition. A number of common plants, including sudangrass, johnsongrass, sorghums and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids contain cyanogenic glycosides in the outer cells of the plant.  Further inside the leaf tissue are the enzymes needed to convert these compounds to the cyanide poison.

  • Scattered throughout any community are tiny, struggling churches.
    Sometimes they’re invisible. If you blink while driving past them you’ll miss them. Or they’re eyesores — run down, weather worn.
    In my 20 years covering local religion for the newspaper, I’ve gotten to know the people at some of these little churches.
    I’ve attended their services and could count the people in the pews with two hands and not need a third.