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Today's Features

  • By Esther Coy,

    guest columnist

    First United Methodist Church

     

    Powerful  discourse resonates through the final sentence of a meaningful message. I noticed that recently while listening to a recording. Dr. Gary Staats of Winebrenner Theological Seminary in Findley, Ohio spoke in reference to The True Scholar.  He used as his text Ecclesiasticus 38:24-34 with reference to Proverbs 1.  

  • Last year we became quasi-temporary guardians of our youngest daughter’s two cats, Mohawk and Target.

    I say quasi-temporary because the daughter has since moved out after staying with us for a year, but the cats are still with us.

    Once our daughter left, we decided to move the cats’ litter box from the guest bathroom to the now-empty spare bedroom. 

    To us humans, that’s a simple change, but not to the cats.

  • OLD UNION CHRISTIAN

    Old Union Christian Church, 6856 Russell Cave Road, Lexington, Ky., will hold its annual Lord’s Auction on Saturday, Oct. 1 beginning at 10:45 a.m. with a dedication of gifts. Auction begins at 11 a.m. Lunch will be sold by Christian Women’s Fellowship.

    Proceeds to benefit the ministries of Old Union Christian Church.

    Scott Winkler is the minister, 859-293-6192; Ed Caswell is the chair, 859-987-3013.

     

    SALTWELL METHODIST

  • THURSDAY, Sept. 29 

    World Explorers. For families with children in Pre-K through 2nd grade. Thursday, Sept. 29 at 5:30 p.m. at the Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library. Each month at the public library we will explore a new topic. This session’s topic will be: SCIENCE. Children and their families will be conducting their own science experiments with common household items. Pre-registration is encouraged and appreciated.

     

    FRIDAY, Sept. 30

  • Preceptor Omega Sorority members are: front row, from left, Linda Root, Patsy Barnett, Cheryl Case, Rosemary Lucas, Barbara Snopek, Pat Terhune; back row, Bonnie Teater, Judy Judy, Kay Cox, Charlene Dawson, Nancy Deitemeyer, Lois Judy and Betty Kay McCullough. The Omega chapter of Beta Sigma Phi celebrated the new sorority year with attending   Beginning Day.. All members were at  a potluck salad supper at the home of

  • * Cynthiana Democrat, July 2, 1981 - “A broken axle on an L & N Railroad car was the apparent cause of a train derailment that occurred about 5:20 a.m. Saturday next to the city parking lot on Bridge Street. Eight railroad cars loaded with coal derailed, blocking three railroad crossings and scattering tons of coal on the Bridge Street parking lot.”

  • I have a Facebook friend in Colorado, another Christian writer I’ve met with a number of times over the years at various Christian publishing events.

    For the past few years she’s been writing about her oldest son, Zach, who is a drug addict.

    He’s had periods of being clean, but they haven’t lasted. Last summer he nearly died from a drug overdose -- his third overdose in less than a year -- and spent several days in ICU on a respirator, suffering seizures.

  • COURTNEY

    The descendents of James, John and Will Courtney will hold their annual reunion Saturday, Oct. 1. As usual it will be held at the Pleasant Green Church fellowship hall. All you need to bring is family, friends and food. We will no longer have the White Elephant sale. A potluck meal will begin at noon.

    Any questions contact Carol at 859-234-1903, Joyce at 859-234-1870, Diane at 859-588-0937 or Judy at 859-234-9486. We have some new babies so I hope to see them.

     

  • Jon Leibeck and Barbara Deniston announce the engagement of their daughter, Vicki Leibeck, to Sean Owsley, son of Faith Ann Owsley and the late John E. Owsley.

    The bride-elect is a graduate of Berea College and is employed at Adair County High School.

    The groom-to-be is also a graduate of Berea College and is employed at Western Kentucky University.

    The wedding will be Oct. 8, 2016, at First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 1100 N. Race St., Glasgow, Ky.

  • While I will admit that half of my vegetable garden looks dreadful, the other half is holding steady because we mulched paths with a heavy layer of wood chips, filled unplanted beds with cover crops and have weeded the rest by hand and hoe.  

    I started using cover crops about eight years ago and I am sold on the multi-purpose usefulness.  

    While many disease pathogens winter over on plant debris and an equal amount remain viable in the soil, it means we need to strategize to keep the garden relatively clean.