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Today's Features

  • The North Central Kentucky Chapter of Project Linus invites the community to participate in its Make-A-Blanket Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 4, at the First United Methodist Church, 1280 Lexington Rd., Georgetown.
    The event will include a “sandwich quilt” assembly to turn finished quilt tops into completed quilts.
    Participants who don’t sew can help by working on fleece blankets that will be ready to assemble.

  • THURSDAY, Sept. 25
    American Girl Activity Club. Thursday, Sept. 25 at 5:30 p.m. for kindergarten through 5th grade. Will be learning about Samantha Parkington of the year 1904.   Pre-registration is appreciated. American Girl Activity Club is made possible in part by a donation in memory of Marquerite “Sug” Kuster.
    Charlotte’s Web. Sept. 25-28 at Rohs Opera House. Tickets available at Biancke’s Restaurant. Directed by Shelley Slade. For more information call 859-234-9803 or visit www.rohsoperahouse.com.

  • The Harrison County Ag Development Board reminds everyone that the deadline for sign-up of the Phase I Program for 2014 is Wednesday, Oct. 1.
    If you have not picked up an application please stop by the Harrison County Extension Office to get one. The applications can be returned to the Extension Office no later than 4:30 p.m. on Oct. 1.
    If you have any questions concerning the application, call the office at 859-234-5510.

  • THURSDAY, Sept. 18
    Harrison County Historical Society
    will meet Sept. 18 at the Hospice of the Bluegrass building, 1317 US Hwy. 62 East, enter via back door. The speaker will be Terry Harris, reference clerk of the Christine Burgen Kentucky Room at the Cynthiana-Harrison County Public Library. She will talk on how to find Kentucky births, death certificates, property records, and more.

  • When we moved to Florida from California 23 years ago, we did so with only the things we could fit into two vehicles.
    That meant getting rid of 15 years’ worth of possessions to start over, which was both sad and exciting.
    I especially hated parting with the coffee table my husband had accidentally autographed.
    He tends to write hard and had been signing checks. After that, at a certain angle you could see a half-dozen “Barry Kennedy” indentations in the table top.

  • I remember an old friend of my dad. His name was Bill. I miss him.
    Years ago when I would visit my dad, the three of us would go to breakfast together. My dad and he would talk about the years that they worked together in air traffic control and the world war that they both served in.
    Bill had such a great attitude. He told me about how he and a German woman forgave each other.
    Bill met this woman who had a strong foreign accent. She told him that she was German. He then said, “You’ll have to forgive me.” She said, “Why?”

  • CALVARY ASSEMBLY OF GOD
    On Sunday, Sept. 21, Calvary Assembly, 325 Webster, will be having two special services. At 10:45 a.m. there will be a special youth service. The youth will do the entire service, including worship, special music, drama and preaching. David Gauze will be bringing the message.

  • Family-friendly fun on a Kentucky farm is right around the corner no matter where you live in the Commonwealth, Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said as he encouraged all Kentuckians to celebrate September Agritourism Month.
    “Kentucky has a wide variety of farm destinations that showcase our unique food culture and our rich agricultural heritage,” Comer said. “Take your family to a u-pick orchard, a fall festival, a pumpkin patch, a trail ride, or any of a number of other agritourism attractions that are affordable, enjoyable, and close to home.”

  • All in all we have had a decent summer with reasonable temperatures and adequate rainfall. I think the marker for the summer of 2014 can go to the weeds!  
    So as you address some fall weeding chores you may also want to do a little preening to give some of your annuals and perennials a facelift for fall.
    As we descend into fall, annuals and perennials will rebound but first we need to get rid of the old, ragged growth.