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Living

  • Ides of March make way for spring and weeds

    Do we still teach children about Brutus’ betrayal of Caesar and to Beware the Ides of March?  
    Well, I hope that this year the Ides of March on March 15 will mark a not so foreboding future.  
    After this last blast of winter weather we are due for spring.  
    My onion slips and seed potatoes should be arriving in the mail. Additionally, we have a March 20 arrival date of 200 Freedom Ranger chicks and the first of our lambs to be born (literally on the first day of spring).

  • Brushes and more
  • Walker visits at Cedar Ridge Health Campus
  • Way Back When

    10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Steven Rex Powell, Feb. 28, son of Leona N. Powell; Ashton James Roach, Feb. 19, son of Steven and Rebecca Roach.
    Adelphia Cable raises classic cable rate.
    Former “Survivor” contestant Rodger “Kentucky Joe” Bingham visits in Cynthiana at the Retired Teacher’s Association meeting.

  • Jonathan Keith Patrick Jr.

    Jonathan Keith Patrick Jr. was born to Jonathan Keith Patrick and Stephanie Marie Buck, Cynthiana, on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at Harrison Memorial Hospital.
    He weighed 4 lbs. 2 oz.
    Maternal grandparents are Stephen Conner and Daisy Edwards of Lexington, Ky.; maternal great-grandparents are Charles R. Conner Sr. and Wilma Conner.
    Paternal grandparents are Mary Patrick and James McAdams; paternal great-grandparents are James Davis and Pam Davis.

  • Planning ahead, order seed

    Like many gardeners this time of the year I, too, have been spending cold winter evenings by the fire with a good catalog.  
    The seed catalogues fill the mailbox and I barely make it up the driveway without taking a peak at what’s offered for 2015.
    Two years ago, I made a procrastinating mistake and waited too long to place my onion and potato order. By the time I got around to it, all of my selections were sold out for the season.

  • Avery Katheryn Slucher

    Avery Katheryn Slucher was born to Jakob and Virginia Slucher on Jan. 16, 2015 at Harrison Memorial Hospital.
    She weighed 6 lbs. 12 oz., and is welcomed by her brother Brantley Slucher.
    Maternal grandparents are Tressie Faulkner of Cynthiana, Ky. and Jerry Faulkner of Berry, Ky.; maternal great-grandparents are Adrian and Georgia Faulkner and the late Donald and Martha Brown.
    Paternal grandparents are Steve and Cathy Slucher of Cynthiana; paternal great-grandparents are Mary Carr and the late Martin Carr, Faye Slucher and the late Hugh Slucher.

  • Way Back When

    10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: Destinei Mae Hutchison, March 4, daughter of Amber Hutchison; Allie Elizabeth Jacobs, Jan. 19, daughter of Marty and Amy Jacobs.
    Harrison County Fiscal Court members discuss takeover of Griffith farm on US 62 W and extends Handy House committee deadline. University of Kentucky professor Phil Crowley asks that the county consider ownership of the Griffith Farm property. Right now, UK owns the travern house and 1.6 acres of the farm. Further discussion will take place at the next meeting.

  • Museum Musings

    * 1950 Telephone Directory -- “RCA Victor Television -- Exciting Television Fun Year In and Year Out -- RCA Victor gives big 52 square inch eye witness television -- Sales and Service -- Adams & Moore, 111 S. Main. Phone 354.”
    * Cynthiana News, Aug. 15, 1867 -- “Mr. J. M. Smith, the proprietor of the Livery Stable on Pleasant Street, authorizes us to say that the report that he had difficulty with one Wilhite on Walnut Street is false.”
    * Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822) -- “If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?”

  • Snow, plants and deicing agents

    We have been trudging about in shin-deep snow for days now and the subzero temperatures have kept us on our toes as we try to keep livestock out of the wind and supplied with hay and water.
    Snow has an insulating effect, which is particularly useful when we do have frigid temperatures.  
    Ground level snow will actually protect the roots and crowns of perennial and woody plants but you may notice a little burn above the snow level when it comes to broadleaf evergreens.