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Living

  • Live or fresh-cut

    It is hard to believe that the holiday season is upon us. I have family visiting for Christmas so this means a bigger tree than normal; if you are going to travel to come see us, this is the least I can do. Plus, it is fun to find the “perfect” tree that fits your space and holds precious ornaments with style.
    So, which type of tree reflects your holiday?
    Do you get a fresh-cut, artificial, balled and burlapped?  Or do you just go out-of-town and let someone else do the decorating?  

  • Memories are made for Sunrise Homemaker Club

    The Sunrise Homemaker Club traveled to Lexington, Ky. on June 9 to visit Peggy Barlow at the Willows Assisted Living Center. Our Club usually did an end of year trip and decided a visit to see Barlow, shopping at Hamburg and eating out sounded like a fun day.
    Barlow, a long time member of the club, had not been active for a few years and could no longer stay in her home in Harrison County. It was a great day for her and she was anxiously awaiting our visit.

  • Coping with cold sores

    (StatePoint) Those pesky cold sores on the lips and around the mouth always seem to pop up at the most inopportune times.
    Not only are cold sores painful, dealing with their appearance can be frustrating. But you’re not alone in dealing with this nuisance. In fact, more than half of the U.S. population carries the herpes simplex virus 1, the virus that causes cold sores, by the time they reach their 20s, according to the National Institutes of Health.

  • Stephens couple celebrate 60th anniversary
  • Woman’s Club holds November luncheon

    The Woman’s Club of Harrison County met Friday, Nov. 14 at Hospice of the Bluegrass for its monthly luncheon.  
    President Anna Ruth McLoney presided over the event. After welcoming members and guests, McLoney requested that a moment of silence be observed to commemorate Veterans’ Day and to honor those past and present who serve and sacrifice for freedom.  
    She led everyone in the Pledge of Allegiance.
    Bonnie Teater offered the blessing of the meal. The luncheon was prepared and served by local caterer Layne Tussey.  

  • MCTC/Licking Valley Campus Workforce Solutions offering painting class Dec. 6

    Bet you don’t know you can create a beautiful oil painting. In fact, if asked most of us would say we could not do this. But you can.
    MCTC/Licking Valley Campus Workforce Solutions is offering a painting class on Saturday, Dec. 6 from 2-4:30 p.m. in Harrison Square that will do this very thing. It is amazing,  Dianne Young, artist residing in Millersburg, Ky., teaches the class and the results are beautiful, every time. What a gift this would make that person who is hard to buy for. The cost of the class is $25.

  • Way Back When

    10 years ago . . .
    Births announced this week are: No births to report this week.
    Sally Cammack opens The Gourd Patch Studio and Folk Art Gallery in Main Street building. Cammack has been painting gourds for 24 years.
    Westside Food Mart, 101 N. Locust Street, serves a deli lunch special every Wednesday. Others items are available throughout the week. Starting Nov. 29  the mart will begin serving breakfast.
    The Country Candle Gift Shop, 312 B S. Church Street and The Cheese Store, Harrison Square will be holding a Christmas Open House.

  • Museum Musings

    * Cynthiana Democrat, Jan. 4, 1918 -- “For Sale -- Columbia Flour, Mill Feed, Hay, Straw, Cotton Seed Meal, Linseed Meal, Tankage, Oyster Shells, Grit, Alfalfa Meal, Salve for Stock, Pratt’s Food and Remedies for Stock and Poultry -- Wm. Addams.” (A 1918 advertisement - any 2014 market for such?)
    * Log Cabin, Nov. 25, 1905 -- “A passenger and express wagon is being run between Cynthiana and Claysville every Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday, by Mr. A. J. Cooper. Passengers, etc. are solicited.”

  • Once plants are on track for dormancy, start winter garden clean up

    Cooler temperatures, a touch of frost and some freezing overnight temperatures are all timely because it allows our plants to make the transition into dormancy.  
    Our winter chill is a bit early but it is inevitable; and predictions call for another memorable one. So, for our plants, the best scenario is to stay cool so they can do what they are supposed to do this time of the year.
    Temperature and day length are the primary factors that trigger dormancy and once plants are on track we can start doing some things to get the garden ready for winter.  

  • Sledding