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Farming

  • Bennett recognized as a Kentucky leading youth livestock exhibitor

    Brittany Bennett of Cynthiana was named one of Kentucky’s leading youth livestock exhibitors and honored for her efforts during the 2013 show season at the 10th annual Kentucky Proud Points Luncheon Oct. 19 in Frankfort.
    “The lessons you learn showing livestock will translate into being productive citizens as adults,” Agriculture Commissioner James Comer told the exhibitors at the luncheon.
    Bennett was a top Kentucky Proud Points exhibitor in dairy.

  • Cacti make good winter houseplants

    Have you ever heard someone say, “All cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are cacti?”  
    Have you ever wondered what the difference is?  
    Well, in the most basic sense, cacti are succulents that do not have leaves.  However, the mere presence of spines (the prickly part of cacti) is not the sole indicator that a plant is a cactus. The various families are actually determined by flower form (just like the orchid).  

  • Harrison Co. Beef Cattle Association to hold annual meeting Nov. 5

    The Harrison County Beef Cattle Association has scheduled their annual Beef Cattle Association meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 5 at the Harrison County Extension Office.  The program will begin at 6 p.m. This will serve as the kick-off to the 2014 year.

  • Kentucky Beef Conference scheduled for Oct. 31

    The Kentucky Beef Conference will be held at the Fayette County Extension Office on Thursday, Oct. 31.  The program will begin at 9 a.m. with registration and the program at 10 a.m. The program is available to any producer in central and eastern Kentucky.
    The title of the program this year is “Todays Challenges, Tomorrows Opportunities.” The highlight of the program includes Troy Applehans from Cattle-Fax.  He will discuss what the beef industry is dealing with now and what the future outlook is.

  • Bennett enters nine holstein in NAILE

    Brittany Bennett, Cynthiana, has entered nine head of Holstein in the Dairy Cattle division of the 40th annual North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE).
    The NAILE is recognized as the world’s largest purebred livestock show with more than 26,000 entries.
    Scheduled for Nov. 9-22, the event takes place at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Ky.

  • Garlic goes in, sweet potatoes come out

    There are two categories of garlic to consider: Allium sativum, or softneck garlic, and Allium ophioscordon, or hardneck garlic.   
    Softneck garlic is the easiest and most widely cultivated because the bulbs are large and the cloves and skin are tight which prevent moisture loss and allows for longer storage.  
    Through centuries of selection softneck garlic has lost the ability to flower so it doesn’t expend energy on producing seed; instead the energy goes towards developing bigger bulbs underground.   

  • The sounds of starlings usher in fall

    The other evening I was sitting outside under a tree babysitting our hens.  
    We have only been letting them out in the evening under supervision until we can get a handle on some fox problems (we are working on it!).  
    As I sat and read, a sense of calm came over me and I was surprised to realize that it was triggered by a little flock of nasty starlings.  
    Starlings start to flock up this time of the year and I guess there was just some sort of Pavlovian response that said, yes, fall is just around the corner, the starlings say so.

  • CPH-45 sales to be offered

    Even with cattle prices being extremely high, marketing animals together with other producers might allow you to receive additional income from your 2013 calf crop. For several years we have offered the program to local producers in our county with the hope of realizing and additional profit for your calves.

  • Cover crops improve the garden as its rests

    Last weekend we tackled some vegetable garden clean up.  
    The hail storm from a few weeks back destroyed most of what was left; subsequent wind and rain finished off the battered remains. So, we replanted a few crops, spread wood chips in the paths to control weeds and filled the remaining empty beds with a cover crop.   
    While many disease pathogens winter over on plant debris an equal amount remain viable in the soil, which means we need to strategize to keep the garden relatively free of disease.  

  • FSA reminds producers of September deadlines for DCP programs

    Kentucky USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director SED John W. McCauley reminds producers of two important Direct and Counter-Cyclical Program (DCP) deadlines this month.
    Producers who have either not yet enrolled in DCP or have not yet signed their DCP contracts must do so by close of business Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Contracts filed after this date will be elevated from the county office to the state office and will require State Committee action.