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Farming

  • Bagworms are on the move

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing something until it’s too late? Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae. Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened. Well, they are at work right now so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most. Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.

  • Fireflies light the night for love

    Likely as a child you collected fireflies in a jar and took them to bed to light up your room on a warm summer night.  
    I remember getting my parents to puncture the lid of a mason jar so the magical insects could breathe.  
    Well, it turns out that all that light flashing wasn’t meant for our entertainment  but rather about entertaining love.
    Researchers at Tufts University and Bringham and Woman’s Hospital have been observing the flashes of fireflies for a decade of summers and what they have uncovered may surprise you.  

  • A season to remember

    2013 is turning into a very unusual cropping year.  Following 2012, hot and dry, 2013, has been cool and wet, relative to some of our recent years. Crops overall seem to be in pretty good shape. The corn and soybeans are on the mark of being outstanding. Grass for grazing continues to be green and excellent for growing our young calves. Hay production has been outstanding, even if we never had a period to harvest our hay. Everything looks rosy at this time. But, there is another side of the story.

  • Harvesting and curing root crops

    Potatoes, garlic and onions:  these three vegetables are staples worldwide largely because of their versatility and their storage-ability.  
    Late July and August is when our spring-planted onions, garlic and potatoes reach maturity and are ready for harvest.  
    If you want to harvest some new potatoes, onions or garlic before they reach maturity enjoy them at the table in short order; however, if you want to store them it is important to harvest them at the correct time.

  • USDA announces results for 45th CRP general sign-up
  • It’s always something. . .

    It seems only fair to share an update to the story since so many of you have been kind enough to lament my troubles with predation on the laying hens and the pastured broilers.  
    If you missed the column from a few weeks back it basically chronicled some owl and fox attacks on our pastured poultry we raise for meat down in the nut grove and our egg-laying hens that range freely around the barn and house during the day.   

  • Barnett attends Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders

    Harrison County High School student Ally Barnett recently returned home from Kentucky Farm Bureau’s Institute for Future Agricultural Leaders (IFAL). Barnett and 45 other high school students from around the state attended the five-day summer leadership conference, held June 23-27 at the University of Kentucky.
    An identical IFAL conference was also held June 16-20 at Murray State University for an additional 45 students.

  • USDA extends acreage reporting deadline for FSA to Aug. 2

    John W. McCauley, USDA Kentucky Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director, announces an extension of the FSA acreage reporting deadline. Farmers and landowners have an additional 18 calendar days to submit their annual report of acreage to their local FSA county office with the deadline extended from Monday, July 15, 2013, to Friday, Aug. 2, 2013. Only the FSA reporting deadline has been extended. The acreage reporting requirement for crop insurance has not changed and remains July 15.

  • A look at crop conditions in Harrison County

    By Gary Carter, Co. ext. agent
    After the heavy rainfall of the past week I am sure most farmers have surveyed their crops. So far most reports seem to be, we got lucky compared to the surrounding counties. Rainfall seems to run from three-five inches in the three day period with a few spots receiving more.
    What effects are showing? Tobacco seems to be the plant that shows the greatest damage. Drowned plants in low, poorly drained areas seems to be constant throughout. The crop also shows a very poor root system which is unable to pick up nutrients.

  • Farm Field Day

    The farm is approximately 860 acres and is farmed by Chad Whitaker, Jarrod Walker, Addison Thomson, Megan Baxter, Kevin Farrell and Lucas Myers. The event was hosted by the Harrison County Extension Service, FSA, FFA students and the soil conservation district. The meal was provided by the Harrison County Beef Cattle Association.