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Farming

  • Acclimate plants carefully to prevent burning foliage

    I made a big mistake last year and burned up my Kalanchoes - it took the entire summer for these cool succulents to recover.  
    I will not make that mistake again. After adding another crinkled-leaf variety to my collection that I purchased from Gallrein’s greenhouses last week, I set to the task of resetting our patio with plants and seat cushions.  

  • Cynthiana FSA conducting sign-up for LIP

    The Cynthiana Service Center Farm Service Agency, serving Harrison County is currently conducting sign-up for the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) to eligible producers who suffered losses beginning Oct. 1, 2011, and subsequent years.

  • Match mulching material with plant’s needs

    Mulch has become a landscape staple, almost to a fault when it is over applied, smothering roots and girdling trunks.  
    When done properly, it can help to suppress weeds, retain moisture and moderate temperature.  
    These things can be achieved using a variety of materials but which type of mulch suits your needs best?
    Predominately, we use organic materials for mulching.  Organic mulches include plant- or animal-derived materials like wood chips, pine needles, tree bark, grass clippings, composted manure and worm castings.

  • Bramble pruning late this year

    The bramble patch is usually cleaned up by now but the cold winter has set us back with a few of our garden chores.  
    It turns out that this may be a good thing after all: The University of Kentucky has sent out a “blackberry alert” urging gardeners to hold off on pruning blackberry and raspberry until new shoots begin to emerge.  
    They are expecting more than usual die back due to our cold winter season.
    Most brambles are biennial which means they fruit on second-year growth.  

  • Leadership Program
  • Meats 101: Beef

    By Benita Peoples, Co. ext. agent
    Protein is an essential part of your daily diet. Meat is an excellent choice of protein. Come learn with us about the new cuts of beef, wet age vs. dry aged: prime, choice and select cuts of beef; grain fed; buying local meats; fat content of beef; and cooking methods based upon the cut of meat selected.

  • Thin vs. fat asparagus

    I was catching up on some magazine reading the other day and on two occasions I read the phrase “choose thin spears” and I got so frustrated.  
    These spring articles were about asparagus and I would like to go on the record that when it comes to homegrown asparagus (and even the wild growing in the fence rows) fat is good.
    The fat spears have always been tender from the garden so don’t let anyone fool you on the fresh from the garden variety. They are particularly well-suited for the charcoal grill.

  • Cool season, slow spring means setbacks in the garden

    I want to say spring has sprung, but it hasn’t.

     

  • Some azaleas thrive in full sun

    Did you know that azaleas and rhododendrons are essentially the same thing?  

    They are both members of the rhododendron genus; they have similar blooms and similar cultural requirements.  Some say the primary difference between the two is the number of pollen-bearing stamens: rhododendron have 10 or more per flower and azaleas have only five.  

  • Skunked Again

    From time to time I see a skunk meandering around the farm during the day, it’s unusual, however.  
    A few years back there was one that was sniffing about under some pines in the lower pasture and it was evident from its movements and from its  awareness  (or lack thereof) of its surroundings that this creature knew it had the advantage.  
    Their eyesight is poor so sneaking up on him to get a photograph was possible but it made me realize that startling a skunk is probably not a good idea.