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Farming

  • Deadline to sign-up for ELAP is Jan. 31

    SED John W. McCauley, State Executive Director of USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) in Kentucky, reminds producers they have until Monday, Jan. 31 to submit an application for payment under the 2010 Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-raised Fish Program (ELAP).
    ELAP provides emergency assistance to eligible producers of livestock, honeybees and farm-raised fish who have losses due to disease, adverse weather or other conditions, including losses due to blizzards, and wildfires.

  • Conservation District cost share program announced

    The Harrison County Conservation District will be accepting requests for cost share funding under the Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality cost Share Program beginning Feb. 1, 2011 and extending through Feb. 28, 2011.

  • Looking forward to the 2011 vegetable garden

    Soon you’ll be receiving the seed catalogs for the 2011 vegetable-growing season. While listening to the cold wind blow outside, what a comfort it is to think about spring and summer and planning your garden.
    To make the most of your garden, every aspiring gardener should follow seven steps to have a successful gardening season.
    •Plan your garden on paper before you begin.
    •Select a good gardening site that has full sun for at least eight hours each day, relatively level, well-drained, close to a water source and not shaded.

  • Tips on controlling insects on indoor plants

    Have you noticed a sticky substance on the floor beneath your ficus or philodendron? Are there little scabs on the under side of the leaves of your orchid? Maybe you have noticed that your plants just look a little lack luster. Well, we can blame some plant puniness on being a tropical houseplant indoors in Kentuckiana during the winter.

  • Harrison County Young Farmers

    The Harrison County Young Farmers group has begun their local meetings, which are held every Monday at 7 p.m. in the Ag room at Harrison County High School.
    The Regional banquet will be Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at the Scott County Extension Office.
    The Harrison County organization will be hosting the state summer tour July 29-30 with local tours and tours in surrounding counties.

  • Consequences of late summer drought and winter salt

    As I write I am comforted by the snow that has accumulated on the boughs of my Nordmann fir and Serbian spruce. It is beautiful, yes, but more important the snow serves as an insulator against desiccating winds and frigid temperatures.  
    We must not forget that evergreens, particularly broadleaf evergreens like rhododendrons and American hollies, lose a great deal of moisture through their leaves in the winter.  
    Winter desiccation is not unusual, but the effects are magnified coming out of a season of drought.

  • Kentucky beef cattle market update

  • Vegetable meeting planned for Monday

    With the snow this week and the cold temperatures who would think it is only a few months until we will be thinking about spring seeding and growing vegetables for 2011.

  • From the pages of The Farmer’s Almanac

    So what does The Old Farmer’s Almanac say about 2011? Even if you don’t follow this sort of prognostication there are some interesting observations based in a little fact and a little myth. Here are a few of my favorites that may explain a bit more about nature as we enter into another year.  
    David Phillips of Environment Canada reminds us that plant and animal activity is rarely an indicator of what is to come but rather what occurred the previous season or year.  

  • Resist temptation to continue bad habits

    We all have bad habits.  Some people chew their fingernails; others mow their grass too short in the summer. You can guess which one bugs me the most.
    The odd thing about many of the worst bad habits in the garden is that they have become so commonplace. The worst offenses are repeated everywhere to the extent that gardeners think they are the rule.
    Over-mulching, for example, has been an epidemic problem for many years despite the fact that research spells out trouble for our plants when we bury their roots under a foot of hardwood mulch.