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Farming

  • Naturalize the landscape with colorful sumacs

    You have probably noticed them in early fall along roadsides in Kentucky and Southern Indiana. The red, orange and purple color of the sumacs usually begins to show up earlier than others, and it usually hangs around a little longer, too.
    You would be hard-pressed to come up with a plant genus that is better for fall color than the sumacs. Whether you’re a flameleaf, staghorn or smooth sumac, fall color is your middle name.

  • FSA guaranteed loan limit increases

    The Farm Service Agency (FSA) lending limit for Guaranteed Loans will be increased to $1,214,000 effective Oct. 1, 2011.
    The lending limit increases every year according to an inflation index. The maximum combined guaranteed and direct farm loan indebtedness will also be increased to $1,514,000.
    As a reminder, the one-time loan origination fee charged on FSA guaranteed Farm Ownership and Operating loans will increase from one percent to 1.5 percent of the guaranteed portion of the loan, for loans obligated after Oct. 1, 2011.

  • Sales closing dates for USDA crop insurance programs are approaching

    Kentucky producers who wish to purchase a Federal crop insurance program policy for the 2012 crop year are reminded of the following closing dates:
    •Barley, wheat, Sept. 30, 2011.
    Insured growers have an opportunity now to make important changes to their coverage. Current policyholders as well as uninsured growers must make decisions on crop insurance coverage, especially which crops to insure and which level of coverage to obtain, prior to the sales closing date for that crop.

  • New Cattle Management and Genetics Program awarded funds

    The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, chaired by Gov. Steve Beshear, approved the Kentucky Beef Network LLC (KBN) for $310,000 in state Agricultural Development Funds to develop and offer the Management and Genetics 60 (MAG-60) program for Kentucky producers.  

  • 4-H Lawn Tractor Driving Contest
  • Harrison County FFA
  • Grubs not always the culprit when it comes to lawn problems

    By Jeneen Wiche, Columnist
    Whenever brown patches or dead spots appear in the lawn we are quick to suspect a grub infestation. This is not always the case though, in fact, contemporary lawn care routines may be more to blame than you realize.  
    Some lawn care habits encourage disease and/or make your lawn more desirable to Japanese beetles and masked chafer beetles, both of which deposit the eggs that grow into grubs.
    The most common disease for lawns around here is brown patch (which is sometimes blamed on grubs).  

  • FSA issues guidance on SURE as program end nears

    Authority for the Supplemental Revenue Assistance (SURE) program, authorized in the 2008 Farm Bill, will draw to a close Sept. 30, 2011. “Farm Service Agency (FSA) wants to ensure that all eligible producers are aware of the approaching deadline,” said John W. McCauley, FSA State Executive Director.

  • 2011 tomato trials

    This year turned out better than last is the first piece of good news.
    In 2010 I wrote, “Sadly, this year was sort of a bust for the vast majority of what I planted.” I can’t do that year after year so thank goodness the tomatoes and zucchini kept pace this time around.  
    Since 2006 I have been bringing my personal tomato trials (and tribulations) to my readers.  

  • Galls form on leaf or stem, rarely causes damage to the tree

    If you have any hackberries around your house, you have probably noticed falling leaves that have little protrusions on them.
    It looks strange and serious but rarely does it cause damage to the tree. What you are seeing is a type of gall. Referred to as spindle or nipple gall, the spindle-like protrusions on the leaves are caused by mites that gather around buds in the spring and enter the leaves as they unfurl.