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Farming

  • Save Your Leaves

    Leaf raking is an autumn chore that only children enjoy because they get to undo it in one fowl swoop. We rake and pile and they jump. I propose a new approach that just may make us all happy:  adults can still rake a little, children can still play and trees will benefit from some mulch and fertilizer. At the farm raking leaves is passé; we let them stay where they fall (with reason, of course) which is usually beneath their canopy.

  • Ag Economist to speak at annual cattle meeting

    By Gary Carter, Co. ext. agent
    Dr. Kenny Burdine, Ag Economist at the University of Kentucky will give his predictions for the beef industry at the Harrison County Beef Cattle Association Annual  meeting. The meeting will be held on Thursday, Nov. 5 at the Harrison County Extension Office. The program will begin at 6 p.m.
    This program is an event to inform the public about our industry and also conduct the business portion of our local association. The Board of Directors would like to invite anyone interested in the beef industry to attend this meeting.

  • Climate determines a tulip's behavior

    When it comes to bulbs we don’t always meet with consistent success. And, before you blame the chipmunks, the girl who mows the grass or the bulb company for their lack-luster performance, consider some of the other factors that influence how well flowering bulbs flower.  
    Sunlight; crowded bulbs; pre-mature removal of foliage the previous season; or a winter rest period that wasn’t cold enough or long enough may play a role in poor performance.  

  • Bennett recognized as a Kentucky leading youth livestock exhibitor

    Brittany Bennett of Cynthiana was named one of Kentucky’s leading youth livestock exhibitors and honored for her efforts during the 2013 show season at the 10th annual Kentucky Proud Points Luncheon Oct. 19 in Frankfort.
    “The lessons you learn showing livestock will translate into being productive citizens as adults,” Agriculture Commissioner James Comer told the exhibitors at the luncheon.
    Bennett was a top Kentucky Proud Points exhibitor in dairy.

  • Cacti make good winter houseplants

    Have you ever heard someone say, “All cacti are succulents, but not all succulents are cacti?”  
    Have you ever wondered what the difference is?  
    Well, in the most basic sense, cacti are succulents that do not have leaves.  However, the mere presence of spines (the prickly part of cacti) is not the sole indicator that a plant is a cactus. The various families are actually determined by flower form (just like the orchid).  

  • Harrison Co. Beef Cattle Association to hold annual meeting Nov. 5

    The Harrison County Beef Cattle Association has scheduled their annual Beef Cattle Association meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 5 at the Harrison County Extension Office.  The program will begin at 6 p.m. This will serve as the kick-off to the 2014 year.

  • Kentucky Beef Conference scheduled for Oct. 31

    The Kentucky Beef Conference will be held at the Fayette County Extension Office on Thursday, Oct. 31.  The program will begin at 9 a.m. with registration and the program at 10 a.m. The program is available to any producer in central and eastern Kentucky.
    The title of the program this year is “Todays Challenges, Tomorrows Opportunities.” The highlight of the program includes Troy Applehans from Cattle-Fax.  He will discuss what the beef industry is dealing with now and what the future outlook is.

  • Bennett enters nine holstein in NAILE

    Brittany Bennett, Cynthiana, has entered nine head of Holstein in the Dairy Cattle division of the 40th annual North American International Livestock Exposition (NAILE).
    The NAILE is recognized as the world’s largest purebred livestock show with more than 26,000 entries.
    Scheduled for Nov. 9-22, the event takes place at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Ky.

  • Garlic goes in, sweet potatoes come out

    There are two categories of garlic to consider: Allium sativum, or softneck garlic, and Allium ophioscordon, or hardneck garlic.   
    Softneck garlic is the easiest and most widely cultivated because the bulbs are large and the cloves and skin are tight which prevent moisture loss and allows for longer storage.  
    Through centuries of selection softneck garlic has lost the ability to flower so it doesn’t expend energy on producing seed; instead the energy goes towards developing bigger bulbs underground.   

  • The sounds of starlings usher in fall

    The other evening I was sitting outside under a tree babysitting our hens.  
    We have only been letting them out in the evening under supervision until we can get a handle on some fox problems (we are working on it!).  
    As I sat and read, a sense of calm came over me and I was surprised to realize that it was triggered by a little flock of nasty starlings.  
    Starlings start to flock up this time of the year and I guess there was just some sort of Pavlovian response that said, yes, fall is just around the corner, the starlings say so.