.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Farming

  • HCBCA seeking new members

    Each year during the annual HCBCA meeting those in attendance are asked to join the local and state association. This year after the meeting the local board discussed ways of increasing our membership. This last month we have discussed this membership drive and would like to introduce a program to encourage your participation.
    Anyone who joins the local county and state cattlemen association will receive a membership card with several local businesses offering discounts to HCBCA members. The following are discounts available to you as a member:

  • Tulipomania and the need for some chilling time

    Spring bulbs popping up everywhere as temperatures roller-coaster from the teens to the 60’s has left many scratching their heads; there is not much we can do to fool Mother Nature so we must be patient and hope that we have a decent display come March.  
    I have some foliage that has turned to mush but the bulb and bloom is still safe beneath the soil surface; the bulb will send up fresh foliage in due time.  

  • ELAP signup deadline is Jan. 30

    USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) in Kentucky reminds producers they have until Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2012, to submit an application for payment under the 2011 Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-raised Fish Program (ELAP).
    ELAP provides emergency assistance to eligible producers of livestock, honeybees and farm-raised fish who have losses due to disease, adverse weather or other conditions, including losses due to blizzards, and wildfires.

  • Farmers’ Market educational meeting set

    The Harrison County Farmers’ Market committee will offer an educational meeting discussing early spring crops including cole crop production.  The meeting will take place Thursday, Jan. 19 at 6:30 p.m. at the Harrison County Extension Office.
    Producers usually question the time of plant and what the expected maturity date would be. This meeting will discuss these matters and will also include seed and plant selection for your garden.

  • Winter perennials have summer-like foliage

    Most people would say that there is not much going on in the garden during the winter months. I beg to differ. There are dozens of plants out there doing something interesting.  Some are just showing their pretty bark or their sculptural quality bare of leaves. Others are just beginning to emerge and will be blooming soon.  And others just have some crazy quality that allows their foliage to look as fresh and clean as a spring garden despite the fact it is winter in Kentuckiana.

  • Tea leaves and herbal concoctions

    We visited friends in Boulder, Colo., over the Christmas holiday and had an opportunity to visit the Celestial Seasonings Tea Company that is headquartered there. In fact, this one factory produces all of their tea sold worldwide.  
    Celestial Tea had humble beginnings with a group of “passionate young entrepreneurs” (i.e hippies in 1969), who began collecting herbs from the slopes of the Rocky Mountains and crafted their own herbal teas to sell to local health food stores.  

  • Binomial System names plant species

    Most of us are not fluent in Latin so distinguishing between an Aesculus parviflora and an Aesculus pavia may take some extra effort. Throw hybrids and cultivars into the mix and our plant choices may increase with our confusion.  
    Categorizing plants is both scientifically and commercially important.

  • 2011 State Fair
  • CSP ranking period cut-off is Jan. 13

    USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announces that the ranking period cut-off date for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) is Jan. 13, 2012. Producers interested in CSP should submit applications to their local NRCS office by the deadline so that their applications can be considered during the first ranking period of 2012.
    The CSP is a voluntary program that encourages agricultural and forestry producers to address resource concerns by: undertaking additional conservation activities; and improving and maintaining existing conservation systems.

  • HIP assists private landowners with wildlife management

    About 95 percent of the land in Kentucky is privately owned. To successfully manage our wildlife resources, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources works cooperatively with Kentucky’s private landowners.