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Farming

  • Mistletoe evident in tree tops

    I like the winter landscape because I can see past the green canvas of summer into neighboring fields where horses graze and a pet cow that is almost as old as me slumbers. I can see mistletoe everywhere, too; driving down the interstate, walking in the park, sitting at a traffic light.  It is there if you look into the canopies of trees devoid of their leafy-ness.
    We are obviously not the first to notice round globs of greenery nestled in tree tops.

  • Grain meeting planned

    Last year in December the Harrison County Extension Center offered a grain meeting which combined five or six of the central Kentucky counties. The same type program will be offered again. On Tuesday, Dec. 13 at the Scott County Extension Office a program will be offered which will begin at 6 p.m.
    Dr. Chad Lee, grain specialist and Dr. Cory Walters, grain marketing specialist, will present the program. With high input cost it is essential to do everything right. With the uncertainly of the grain market and the overall economy this should be a very beneficial program.

  • Barnes’ project featured in KFB ag science display

    Kyle Barnes was among the 11 students selected from across the state to display an agriculture science project at this week’s Kentucky Farm Bureau annual meeting in Louisville.
    Barnes, a fifth grade student from Cynthiana, exhibited a project called “Alfalfa vs. Grass Hay.” This experiment explored a horse’s taste preferences of two types of hay.
    His winning project was awarded $75.00 and a certificate of recognition for his participation at the state level.

  • Beef Cattle Association holds annual meeting

    The Harrison County Beef Cattle Association held their annual meeting on Monday, Nov. 7 at the Harrison County Extension Office. One hundred and thirty local producers and their family members attended this meeting. The meeting carried significance with visitors from the Franklin County, Ala. area attending the meeting and making a presentation about the help which they received from our county following the tornado outbreak last spring.  

  • Pick poinsettias at their peak

    I seriously cannot believe it is December. It is time to start decorating for the holidays which includes the poinsettia.  
    The poinsettia has been a fixture in American homes as a holiday decoration for as long as most of us can remember.  
    I think it is fair to say that it is considered the ‘official’ Christmas flower. In fact the U.S. Census Bureau says that over 75 million plants were sold last holiday season.  
    The poinsettia is native to Mexico and has been recognized for its beauty and function for centuries.

  • FSA offers producers a free online news service

    USDA Kentucky Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director, John W. McCauley announces that farmers and ranchers in Kentucky now have a more efficient, timely option for receiving important FSA program eligibility requirements, deadlines and related information.

  • Checklist for preparing for winter

    Several years ago I made the mistake of leaving the water pump in the barn instead of storing it in the basement.  
    Well, I found out why Daddy always stored it in the basement during the cold days of winter. When I got the pump out to do some irrigation the following summer, the primer tank had split right open.  
    A little bit of moisture was left in the tank and it froze.  The tank is made of cast iron so imagine what a little moisture might do to your favorite terracotta pot.

  • Checklist for preparing garden for winter

    There are many gardening tasks that must be done or are better done in the fall of the year.  
    Things like cleaning up old plant material; fertilizing trees, shrubs and lawns; and protecting tender plants like hybrid tea roses and French hydrangeas.  
    These chores are all a part of garden maintenance and taking care of them now will improve the quality of your garden later.
    Here’s a checklist to remind you of what needs to be done to get the garden ready for winter.
    Clean-Up

  • Farmers Outreach Presentation to be held Monday evening

    On Monday, Nov. 21, at 7 p.m. we are planning an important meeting at the Harrison County Extension Office. Officer Brian Gilliam/Unit 4309 of the Kentucky State Police, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement will be on hand to discuss issues pertaining to farm equipment and trucking in Kentucky.

  • Prune brambles now

    It’s time to clean up the bramble patch: In order to maintain healthy and productive blackberries and raspberries, we need to prune out the old to make room for the new.   
    Most brambles are biennial, which means they fruit on second-year growth.  Blackberries are easy to deal with, just remove the arching canes that fruited this year and trim up and trellis the new growth from this summer which will bear next summer’s fruit. Repeat the same thing next year.