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Farming

  • 2011 State Fair
  • CSP ranking period cut-off is Jan. 13

    USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announces that the ranking period cut-off date for the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) is Jan. 13, 2012. Producers interested in CSP should submit applications to their local NRCS office by the deadline so that their applications can be considered during the first ranking period of 2012.
    The CSP is a voluntary program that encourages agricultural and forestry producers to address resource concerns by: undertaking additional conservation activities; and improving and maintaining existing conservation systems.

  • HIP assists private landowners with wildlife management

    About 95 percent of the land in Kentucky is privately owned. To successfully manage our wildlife resources, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources works cooperatively with Kentucky’s private landowners.

  • Reflecting on a new year in the garden and on the farm

    Hope you don’t mind that I take this opportunity to reflect a little.  
    Another year is gone, I remember my elders marveling over this and how quickly time goes by and I get it now.  
    I have learned some this year, but I don’t necessarily feel smarter; I have aged some, but don’t necessarily feel older; and I have made new friends that have taught me that there is always potential which has made me excited about the rest of my life.

  • FSA offers producers a free online news service

    USDA Kentucky Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director, John W. McCauley announces that farmers in Kentucky now have a more efficient, timely option for receiving important FSA program eligibility requirements, deadlines and related information.

  • Holiday greenery has meaning

    Holiday greenery has a history that goes well beyond the Victorian Christmas tree we gather around today.
    Most of the holiday greenery we use to decorate dates back to the pagan holidays of the Romans and Northern Europeans when certain plants where chosen for their symbolic powers of restoration and protection.

  • Mistletoe evident in tree tops

    I like the winter landscape because I can see past the green canvas of summer into neighboring fields where horses graze and a pet cow that is almost as old as me slumbers. I can see mistletoe everywhere, too; driving down the interstate, walking in the park, sitting at a traffic light.  It is there if you look into the canopies of trees devoid of their leafy-ness.
    We are obviously not the first to notice round globs of greenery nestled in tree tops.

  • Grain meeting planned

    Last year in December the Harrison County Extension Center offered a grain meeting which combined five or six of the central Kentucky counties. The same type program will be offered again. On Tuesday, Dec. 13 at the Scott County Extension Office a program will be offered which will begin at 6 p.m.
    Dr. Chad Lee, grain specialist and Dr. Cory Walters, grain marketing specialist, will present the program. With high input cost it is essential to do everything right. With the uncertainly of the grain market and the overall economy this should be a very beneficial program.

  • Barnes’ project featured in KFB ag science display

    Kyle Barnes was among the 11 students selected from across the state to display an agriculture science project at this week’s Kentucky Farm Bureau annual meeting in Louisville.
    Barnes, a fifth grade student from Cynthiana, exhibited a project called “Alfalfa vs. Grass Hay.” This experiment explored a horse’s taste preferences of two types of hay.
    His winning project was awarded $75.00 and a certificate of recognition for his participation at the state level.

  • Beef Cattle Association holds annual meeting

    The Harrison County Beef Cattle Association held their annual meeting on Monday, Nov. 7 at the Harrison County Extension Office. One hundred and thirty local producers and their family members attended this meeting. The meeting carried significance with visitors from the Franklin County, Ala. area attending the meeting and making a presentation about the help which they received from our county following the tornado outbreak last spring.