.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Farming

  • Peonies are long-lived in the garden

    A couple of weeks ago, in mid-April, one of the prettiest flowers in the garden started to bloom. This great cut-leaf Japanese peony, Paeonia tenuifolia, opened its simple ruby-colored petals to reveal bright yellow stamen.  
    The finely cut foliage, reminiscent of the most finely cut foliage of a Japanese maple, allows the plant to be interesting in the mixed border the rest of the growing season, too.  

  • New proposed BioPreferred regulation to expand biobased products for federal purchase

    Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announces the publication in the Federal Register of new proposed guidelines for the USDA BioPreferred program that could expand the ability of USDA to designate biobased products for Federal purchase. USDA is proposing to allow for the designation of intermediate ingredients such as fibers, resins, and chemicals so that the products made from them could more easily be designated for preferred Federal procurement.

  • HCFM logo winners
  • Pruning chores after the big spring bloom

    By Jeneen  Wiche, columnist
    June 1 is the official cut off that marks the difference between a spring bloomer and a summer bloomer.
    Does it matter that you know? Yes, if you want to properly prune because pruning after June 1 could result in no blooms next year.
    This spring was a great one for spring bloomers: lilacs, viburnums, azaleas, rhododendrons and many others were all able to do their thing without a major frost or freeze here at the farm.   

  • Meet the people serving you at the Harrison County Farmers Market

    By Vickie Fryman

  • No-till philosophy easy on the soil

    One of the most anticipated rites of spring is dusting off the tiller and heading out to the vegetable garden for a little soil play.
    It is one of those things you can’t plan for, though. It becomes a waiting game because we can’t do it if the soil is too wet; we don’t want to do it if it is too cold and we only have the time to do it when the weekend rolls around.
    Well, what would you say if I told you that you were off the hook when it comes to spring tilling?  

  • On-farm investments available to farmers

    The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, chaired by Gov. Steve Beshear, recently awarded $40,000 in Harrison County Agricultural Development Funds for a County Agricultural Investment Program (CAIP).
    The Harrison County Beef Cattle Association submitted a proposal to the Harrison County Agricultural Development Council and the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board to provide cost-share incentives to area farmers.

  • Farmers Market to open April 21

    The Harrison County Farmers Market has scheduled the opening date for April 21. In a mailer last week, I had mentioned the date of April 28 as the starting date. This was an incorrect start date and I wanted to correct this for the general public.
    On Saturday, April 21, the group hopes to have some cole crops, onions, lettuce and some plants for sale. We will also have some locally made crafts which will be offered.
    Again, the market will have producers from Harrison, Roberson, Bourbon, Nicholas and Pendleton counties.

  • Cedar rusts and fire blight concerns

    Warmer-than-normal conditions this spring are causing a few concerns for apple growers. The biggest threats right now are cedar rusts and fire blight. Cedar rust galls are developing. As galls swell, they produce spores that threaten apple (and sometimes crabapple and hawthorn). Swelling galls were observed on cedar in Lexington in mid-March. Warmer temperatures in Western Kentucky provided conditions for even earlier gall development.

  • CRP sign-up deadline extended to April 13

    The USDA Farm Service Agency announces that the sign-up deadline for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) has been extended to April 13.
    After the CRP general sign-up ends on April 13, FSA will evaluate offers based on cost and the Environmental Benefits Index (EBI) takes into consideration variables such as wildlife habitat, water quality protection, soil erosion reduction, air quality protection and other enduring benefits. Accepted offers will become effective Oct. 1, 2012.