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Farming

  • Watch for bagworms

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing something until it’s too late?  
    Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae.Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened.  
    Well, they are at work right now so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most.
    Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.
    Ten years ago or so I saw the worst bagworm infestation I have ever seen in my life.  

  • Continuous sign-up for CRP Highly Erodible Land Initiative announced

    The Kentucky USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) announces that continuous sign-up for the  Highly Erodible Land (HEL)  Initiative under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) started on July 23, 2012. Kentucky received a total allocation of 39,400 acres to enroll in the HEL CRP program. Offers will be accepted until either the state acreage allocation limit is reached or Sept. 30, 2012 whichever occurs first.

  • Dividing plants helps improve health, bloom

    We have all asked the question “Why hasn’t my plant bloomed?” Sometimes the answer is as simple as not enough sunlight, not old enough, not cold enough or hot enough, etc.
    In fact, it could be as simple as a little digging and dividing for some renewed blooming attitude.
    For most of my herbaceous perennials I wait until early fall to do a good portion of my digging and dividing.   

  • USDA officials stand with farmers affected by extreme weather, natural disasters

    As serious drought conditions continue to creep across nearly two-thirds of the lower 48 states, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials are fanning out to rural communities across the country to show support to farmers and ranchers affected by a string of extreme weather in 2012.

  • Deadline July 16 for FSA programs

    The USDA’s Farm Service Agency is reminding producers that deadlines are approaching for various assistance programs.
    The annual crop certification deadline is July 16, by which producers must file accurate reports for all crops and land uses, including failed acreage and prevented planting to ensure they receive the maximum FSA program benefits possible.

  • Small ears may mean poor pollination

    I gave up growing corn a long time ago; figured others can grow it better than me so why take up the space. I drive by Gallrein’s in Bagdad, Ky., twice a week and their “Sweet Corn” sign has been hung so there are no worries, they have the best corn this side of the Mississippi.
    The corn is looking good in some areas of my county and not so in others.

  • Fear not, bamboo can be controlled

    Most of us have learned to fear bamboo. I used to think that the only good place for them was in planting beds that were smack-dab-in-the-middle of parking lots … no chance of a runner reaching your garden in that case.  
    It’s the horror stories that stick with us.  
    We usually only hear about the invasive claims about bamboo and how it escaped a neighbor’s yard only to take over your prized perennial bed.  

  • 4-H Fun Horse Show
  • BQA Chute-side training planned

    Harrison County’s Cooperative Extension Agent Gary Carter along with intern Eli Mann will be conducting a Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Chute-side Training.  The BQA training will be held Aug. 4 starting at 10 a.m. at the Harrison County High School’s Vocational Agriculture Farm.
    The goal of the BQA program is to maximize consumer confidence and acceptance of beef by focusing the producers’ attention to daily production practices that influence safety, wholesomeness and quality of beef and beef products.

  • Corn concerns

    A number of farmers are wondering what can I do with all of this non-productive corn. The drought has nearly eliminated all corn where there was no watering capabilities. Those fields that were watered may be hurt due to the extreme temperatures and pollination failed to occur.