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Farming

  • Planting time almost here

    I am plotting and planning and placing orders for onion sets and seed potatoes and summer crops that will be directly seeded in the garden once the temperatures really warm.
    I can barely stand the wait!  
    I have two trays of seedlings that I started about two weeks ago and have begun another round of kale, broccoli and Brussels sprouts in three more trays.
    My set up is not elaborate; it basically consists of a kit that includes a plastic dome that fits over a seed tray and pan.  

  • Report shows continued decrease in beef cow numbers

    Late January brought USDA’s Cattle Inventory report, which provided an estimate of cattle numbers across the US. As expected, beef herd liquidation continued during 2011, despite the stronger fall markets. The severe drought that plagued much of the southern plains pushed many cows to slaughter and forced many ranchers to reduce their herd size. Estimated beef cow numbers fell by three percent, which is the largest single year decrease in many years.

  • FFA tractor parade
  • Witch hazels already in bloom

    Gardeners get anxious this time of the year. Warm one day, cold the next, the sun coaxes open a little patch of crocus by the path or we catch sight of an old landscape filled with waves of blooming white snow drops.  
    This year, the show is sure to come early and the forsythia are not the first to bloom, despite this oft cited sign of spring. There are other early bloomers to keep us occupied until spring truly arrives.

  • I can make anyone love Brussels sprouts

    Brussels sprouts need a PR make-over, no one seems to like them. Old varieties have been greatly improved from those forced on you as a child.  
    Equally, cooking methods probably can stand some updating from the warm, mushy, bitter Barbie-doll-sized cabbage; don’t boil them to death, try instead some quick roasting underneath the broiler.  

  • Conservation breakfast planned for Feb. 17

    The Harrison  County Conservation District along with the Natural Resource and Conservation Service will be hosting a Conservation breakfast meeting on Friday, Feb. 17 at the Cooperative Extension Office.
    This program will be extremely informative for all Harrison County landowners to become better aware of the programs available to assist them with their farm operations. Even though this meeting is geared towards our county landowners, all county residents are welcome to attend. Breakfast will be served at 7:30 a.m. and the program will take place from 8-10 a.m.

  • Gear up for orchard maintenance

    I am so grateful that my husband Andy is in charge of the orchard.  
    Fruit tree maintenance, I am convinced, is an art. There are details to pruning that can make or break good fruit set, branch structure and ability to pick when the limbs are laden with ripe fruit.  
    While I understand the basics, I am glad Andy is the one that executes the task.  
    A healthy fruit crop from the orchard can be achieved by doing a few things this time of the year.  

  • Young green grass carries risk of tetany in cattle

    This year has started unusually warm and wet. So much so that grass is beginning to green early than past seasons. With young green grass it is thought to be an advantage but it also carries the risk of grass tetany for cow/calf producers.

  • Landowners, producers will have four weeks to enroll in CRP beginning in March

    The Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director, John W. McCauley, announces that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will conduct a four-week Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) general signup, beginning on March 12 and ending on April 6. CRP has a 25-year legacy of successfully protecting the nation’s natural resources while providing significant economic and environmental benefits to rural communities across the United States.

  • Farmers Market annual meeting scheduled for Feb. 16

    The Board of Directors of the Harrison County Farmers Market invites you to the upcoming annual meeting on Thursday, Feb. 16 at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will take place at the Harrison County Extension Office.