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Farming

  • Break out the shade devices early

    Boy, from the frying pan into the fire these first few weeks of May.
    The vegetable garden will be responding -- for better and for worse -- to in the upper 80’s so early in the season.  
    One thing we can do to alleviate a little heat stress is to employ some shade devices for our spring crops and seedlings.
    The vegetable garden can start doing some funny things during a heat wave. When temperatures start to raise into the upper 80s and 90s many vegetables drop flowers before pollination and fruit set; and stop blooming all together.  

  • Producers encouraged to apply for Specialty Crop Grant funding

    Kentucky producers and organizations may apply to the Kentucky Department of Agriculture for funding from the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program.
    “Kentucky’s climate and soil are well suited for production of specialty crops,” Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said. “These funds will help expand Kentucky’s specialty crop production and diversify. I encourage all eligible individuals and organizations to apply.”

  • 2012 ag development sign-ups underway

    The Harrison County Phase I Committee held the educational meeting on Monday, April 30 at the Harrison County Extension Office. At the meeting 161 local farmers received applications for the 2012 Phase I projects.  
    During the meeting the group received information concerning programs this year and deadlines for signing up. All applications are due to the Extension Office by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, May 14.  Following the application period, the local board will score the applications and notify the first group who are approved.

  • HCFM introduces more farmers for your shopping needs

    By Vickie Fryman

  • Peonies are long-lived in the garden

    A couple of weeks ago, in mid-April, one of the prettiest flowers in the garden started to bloom. This great cut-leaf Japanese peony, Paeonia tenuifolia, opened its simple ruby-colored petals to reveal bright yellow stamen.  
    The finely cut foliage, reminiscent of the most finely cut foliage of a Japanese maple, allows the plant to be interesting in the mixed border the rest of the growing season, too.  

  • New proposed BioPreferred regulation to expand biobased products for federal purchase

    Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announces the publication in the Federal Register of new proposed guidelines for the USDA BioPreferred program that could expand the ability of USDA to designate biobased products for Federal purchase. USDA is proposing to allow for the designation of intermediate ingredients such as fibers, resins, and chemicals so that the products made from them could more easily be designated for preferred Federal procurement.

  • HCFM logo winners
  • Pruning chores after the big spring bloom

    By Jeneen  Wiche, columnist
    June 1 is the official cut off that marks the difference between a spring bloomer and a summer bloomer.
    Does it matter that you know? Yes, if you want to properly prune because pruning after June 1 could result in no blooms next year.
    This spring was a great one for spring bloomers: lilacs, viburnums, azaleas, rhododendrons and many others were all able to do their thing without a major frost or freeze here at the farm.   

  • Meet the people serving you at the Harrison County Farmers Market

    By Vickie Fryman

  • No-till philosophy easy on the soil

    One of the most anticipated rites of spring is dusting off the tiller and heading out to the vegetable garden for a little soil play.
    It is one of those things you can’t plan for, though. It becomes a waiting game because we can’t do it if the soil is too wet; we don’t want to do it if it is too cold and we only have the time to do it when the weekend rolls around.
    Well, what would you say if I told you that you were off the hook when it comes to spring tilling?