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Farming

  • Small ears may mean poor pollination

    I gave up growing corn a long time ago; figured others can grow it better than me so why take up the space. I drive by Gallrein’s in Bagdad, Ky., twice a week and their “Sweet Corn” sign has been hung so there are no worries, they have the best corn this side of the Mississippi.
    The corn is looking good in some areas of my county and not so in others.

  • Fear not, bamboo can be controlled

    Most of us have learned to fear bamboo. I used to think that the only good place for them was in planting beds that were smack-dab-in-the-middle of parking lots … no chance of a runner reaching your garden in that case.  
    It’s the horror stories that stick with us.  
    We usually only hear about the invasive claims about bamboo and how it escaped a neighbor’s yard only to take over your prized perennial bed.  

  • 4-H Fun Horse Show
  • BQA Chute-side training planned

    Harrison County’s Cooperative Extension Agent Gary Carter along with intern Eli Mann will be conducting a Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Chute-side Training.  The BQA training will be held Aug. 4 starting at 10 a.m. at the Harrison County High School’s Vocational Agriculture Farm.
    The goal of the BQA program is to maximize consumer confidence and acceptance of beef by focusing the producers’ attention to daily production practices that influence safety, wholesomeness and quality of beef and beef products.

  • Corn concerns

    A number of farmers are wondering what can I do with all of this non-productive corn. The drought has nearly eliminated all corn where there was no watering capabilities. Those fields that were watered may be hurt due to the extreme temperatures and pollination failed to occur.

  • FSA now accepting pollinator habitats in Continuous CRP

    Kentucky USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director John W. McCauley, announces that pollinator habitats, which support a variety of pollinator species, will now be accepted as a Continuous Sign-up Conservation Reserve Program (CCRP) practice. CCRP is a voluntary program that helps producers apply conservation practices to safeguard environmentally sensitive land.

  • Feds feeds families

    Across the country, there continues to be a need to feed the hungry, particularly in the summer months when there are shortages in food banks and an increased need among children who are out of school and not benefitting from school lunch programs. Feds Feeds Families, or FFF, began four years ago to help fill a gap during the summer months, when food banks and pantries struggle with an increase in demand from families and individuals, but a decrease in donations.

  • Tomatoes by the Fourth of July

    Knock on wood, please, because I may jinx myself by publically declaring that my tomatoes look awesome.  
    It is the healthiest set of plants and fruit that I can ever remember, honestly.  
    The plants are remarkably free of any pest problem, brown or yellowing leaf or rotting fruit.  
    Most are heirloom varieties; they were fertilized once at planting with fish emulsion and immediately mulched with newspaper and pine straw. One irrigation occurred during a hot, dry spell but that is it.

  • FSA now accepting county committee nominations

    Kentucky’s USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director John McCauley, wants to remind farmers and landowners that local Farm Service Agency (FSA) county committee nomination began on Friday, June 15.   

  • Furry pests in the garden, barriers best bet

    If you have a garden chances are you appreciate nature in all its glory.  
    But, sometimes nature gets in the way of our desires to cultivate.  
    Deer browsing, rabbit munching, squirrel digging, bird pecking, mole trenching and resident vole feasting have all come up in the last two weeks.  
    While I have no silver bullet for any of these problems, I do have some practical approaches to offset the shared use of our gardens.  
    Squirrels are notorious for taking one bite of a tomato and then throwing it on the ground.