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Farming

  • Livestock producers affected by disasters urged to keep good records

    USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director John W. McCauley urges livestock producers affected by natural disasters such as Hurricane Isaac and the continuing drought to keep thorough records of their livestock and feed losses, including additional expenses for such things as feed purchases because of lost supplies.
    FSA recommends that owners and producers record all pertinent information of natural disaster consequences, including:

  • Drought, heat causes stress

    “Newly transplanted trees must remain hydrated in order for the natural process of root system regeneration to begin” writes Roger Harris, associate professor of horticulture at Virginia Polytechnic Institute.  
    This is something that has been repeated countless times this summer by many in the green industry, yet, I fear, some homeowners may have turned a deaf ear.  
    With record breaking heat and drought conditions for many in Kentuckiana, plants suffer the most if their care-giver is less than committed.

  • Potato and purslane a great combination

    I was among friends last week, discussing the virtues of okra.  
    Some preferred to categorize the “slime” as a “thickening agent” while others insisted you need to be a wood pecker to eat one.  
    The little ones are best, of course, but often they get too big to be edible.  
    While okra is indeed a great thickening agent in gumbo and other quintessential southern dishes, there is another plant lurking in the garden that can do the same- and you can usually just find it growing along a path or in the flower garden.  

  • Cantaloupes reportedly connected to statewide salmonellosis outbreak

    The Department for Public Health (DPH) reports that  cantaloupes tested in the state public health laboratory carry the same strain of Salmonella associated with a statewide outbreak that health officials say is still ongoing.

  • Farmers Market
  • 2012 corn crop has no grain

    By Gary Carter, Co. ext. agent
    Many of the fields in Harrison County and also other counties in Central Kentucky look good. The one exception is the corn has no grain.
    Many of the fields grew normally early in the season.  When the extreme dry and hot weather occurred corn was attempting to develop and ear and receive pollen. With the extreme weather, little or no grain fill formed and we now have corn stalks with limited grain.

  • Preserving your garden

    I am getting ready to head back to U of L where I teach two courses so I really need to get organized.
    The garden is still producing and time needs to be spent on turning some of the bounty into things that can be enjoyed during the winter months.  
    I have had the dehydrator going everyday this last week drying apples, peaches and berries, cherry tomatoes and potatoes.  
    Plus, predictions of rising food costs (ironically current reports indicate that grain and sugar prices are affecting prices now and I don’t eat much of that).

  • Whirlwind was weird

    I saw the strangest thing the other day:  A bona fide whirlwind?  
    I was taking water to the ewes and lambs mid-day and I looked up to see this swarm of plant material -and whatever else was in it- swirl around a viburnum.  
    It was hot out and only the slightest breeze was apparent.  
    Since I was by myself I had to comment to the sheep and the dogs, “Oh my gosh, look at that, that is so weird!”  

  • Watch for bagworms

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing something until it’s too late?  
    Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae.Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened.  
    Well, they are at work right now so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most.
    Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.
    Ten years ago or so I saw the worst bagworm infestation I have ever seen in my life.  

  • Continuous sign-up for CRP Highly Erodible Land Initiative announced

    The Kentucky USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) announces that continuous sign-up for the  Highly Erodible Land (HEL)  Initiative under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) started on July 23, 2012. Kentucky received a total allocation of 39,400 acres to enroll in the HEL CRP program. Offers will be accepted until either the state acreage allocation limit is reached or Sept. 30, 2012 whichever occurs first.