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Farming

  • Cantaloupes reportedly connected to statewide salmonellosis outbreak

    The Department for Public Health (DPH) reports that  cantaloupes tested in the state public health laboratory carry the same strain of Salmonella associated with a statewide outbreak that health officials say is still ongoing.

  • Farmers Market
  • 2012 corn crop has no grain

    By Gary Carter, Co. ext. agent
    Many of the fields in Harrison County and also other counties in Central Kentucky look good. The one exception is the corn has no grain.
    Many of the fields grew normally early in the season.  When the extreme dry and hot weather occurred corn was attempting to develop and ear and receive pollen. With the extreme weather, little or no grain fill formed and we now have corn stalks with limited grain.

  • Preserving your garden

    I am getting ready to head back to U of L where I teach two courses so I really need to get organized.
    The garden is still producing and time needs to be spent on turning some of the bounty into things that can be enjoyed during the winter months.  
    I have had the dehydrator going everyday this last week drying apples, peaches and berries, cherry tomatoes and potatoes.  
    Plus, predictions of rising food costs (ironically current reports indicate that grain and sugar prices are affecting prices now and I don’t eat much of that).

  • Whirlwind was weird

    I saw the strangest thing the other day:  A bona fide whirlwind?  
    I was taking water to the ewes and lambs mid-day and I looked up to see this swarm of plant material -and whatever else was in it- swirl around a viburnum.  
    It was hot out and only the slightest breeze was apparent.  
    Since I was by myself I had to comment to the sheep and the dogs, “Oh my gosh, look at that, that is so weird!”  

  • Watch for bagworms

    Who among us is guilty of not noticing something until it’s too late?  
    Yes, all of a sudden there is nothing left of your blue spruce or arborvitae.Bagworms have been munching on the needles for weeks and we wonder how it all happened.  
    Well, they are at work right now so go outside and take inventory of your evergreens because that’s what the bagworm likes the most.
    Now is the time they do their damage unless we put a stop to it.
    Ten years ago or so I saw the worst bagworm infestation I have ever seen in my life.  

  • Continuous sign-up for CRP Highly Erodible Land Initiative announced

    The Kentucky USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) announces that continuous sign-up for the  Highly Erodible Land (HEL)  Initiative under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) started on July 23, 2012. Kentucky received a total allocation of 39,400 acres to enroll in the HEL CRP program. Offers will be accepted until either the state acreage allocation limit is reached or Sept. 30, 2012 whichever occurs first.

  • Dividing plants helps improve health, bloom

    We have all asked the question “Why hasn’t my plant bloomed?” Sometimes the answer is as simple as not enough sunlight, not old enough, not cold enough or hot enough, etc.
    In fact, it could be as simple as a little digging and dividing for some renewed blooming attitude.
    For most of my herbaceous perennials I wait until early fall to do a good portion of my digging and dividing.   

  • USDA officials stand with farmers affected by extreme weather, natural disasters

    As serious drought conditions continue to creep across nearly two-thirds of the lower 48 states, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) officials are fanning out to rural communities across the country to show support to farmers and ranchers affected by a string of extreme weather in 2012.

  • Deadline July 16 for FSA programs

    The USDA’s Farm Service Agency is reminding producers that deadlines are approaching for various assistance programs.
    The annual crop certification deadline is July 16, by which producers must file accurate reports for all crops and land uses, including failed acreage and prevented planting to ensure they receive the maximum FSA program benefits possible.