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Farming

  • Tobacco meeting planned for Monday

    It’s hard to believe that we are beginning to plan for the 2013 crop year. Following a summer of super-hot temperatures and limited rainfall, it sure would be nice to enjoy a seasonable year.
    This past season tobacco seems to be a growing interest for several producers in our county. Prices have been good and those producing the crop seem to be very consistent. Because of this we will have a tobacco production meeting on Monday, Jan. 28 at the Harrison County Extension Center. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m.

  • Conservation District accepting applications for Ky. Soil Erosion, Water Quality Cost Share program

    The Harrison County Conservation District is now accepting Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality Cost Share applications on a continuous basis. This continual sign-up is designed to make the program more landowner friendly and help address the needs of a landowner at any time during the year. As landowners plan conservation projects with the assistance of their local conservation district, they will be able to apply for financial assistance for those projects without having to wait for a designated sign up period.

  • Too good to be true? Don’t believe outrageous claims

    This time of the year subtle warnings come from professionals reminding the consumer to be skeptical of mail order catalogues or advertisements that claim “new horticultural breakthroughs,” otherwise outrageous claims or mass quantities of things for bargain basement prices.  
    There are legitimate “horticultural breakthroughs,” but usually different terminology is used and you’ll find them at your local stores.   

  • January: A good check point for spring heifer programs

    January is an extremely important “checkpoint” in spring heifer development programs. The key to proper heifer development lies in understanding the factors that influence conception in yearling heifers. One key factor regulating heifer fertility is age at puberty. Most producers don’t consider age at puberty of their heifers to be a major problem, yet few know how many heifers are actually cyclic at the beginning of the breeding season.

  • Quality and care means garden equipment lasts longer

    We had our Scag mower serviced a few weeks back. She suffered from some sort of oil leak all summer and looked a little weary and unkempt so I felt a bit negligent when I dropped her off.
    Taking care of your lawn and garden equipment was something that was pounded into my world view of farm responsibilities when I was growing up.  

  • Items to consider when preparing pastures for 2013

    As we approach another year with our cattle operations it is important that we consider our pastures and the maintenance that will be needed. The following is a few items we need to consider as we prepare for 2013.

  • Follow your instinct. . .

    If there was anything that I came to understand more profoundly this year it would have to be the power of instinct: mine, our animals and the forces of ideologies of which I agree and disagree.
    I reread my year end column from 2011, which reminded me of where I was 12 months ago; it helps me better appreciate where I am today.
    It seems we didn’t do too badly, after all, and it’s all because both Andy and I recognize the power of instinct.

  • Starlings en masse create nuisance

    Last Sunday I felt like I was under siege.  
    There were starlings everywhere; so much so that I feared being splattered with poop at every turn.  
    The surprising thing about starlings is that they are everywhere yet not from here.  It’s another story of one good intention going bad.
    Apparently back in 1890, in honor of a Shakespeare festival in New York City’s Central Park, 60 European starlings were released.  

  • Two Cynthiana farms join the American Angus Association

    Bluegrass Heights Farm and Sweet T Farm, Cynthiana, are new members of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.
    The American Angus Association, with more than 25,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest beef breed association in the world. Its computerized records include detailed information on more than 17 million registered Angus.

  • Harrison County receives funds for local 4-H program

    This week Harrison County 4-H Council will receive $244 from the Kentucky 4-H Foundation as part of the Tractor Supply Company (TSC) Paper Clover Campaign. The Kentucky 4-H Foundation will be distributing more than $14,000 to 45 County 4-H Councils.
    The TSC Paper Clover Campaign is a nationwide, in-store fundraiser that benefits 4-H programming at the local, state, and national levels.  During the campaign, TSC customers can support 4-H by purchasing paper clovers for a $1 or more at checkout.