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Farming

  • FSA county committee nominations begin June 15

    The nomination period for local Farm Service Agency (FSA) county committees begins Sunday, June 15, 2014.
    To be eligible to serve on an FSA county committee, a person must participate or cooperate in a program administered by FSA, be eligible to vote in a county committee election and reside in the local administrative area where the person is nominated.

  • Some plants like it wet

    There are some plants that demand good drainage:  taxus, coreopsis, gaillardia and penstemon, to name a few.  I have lost them all because they were poorly sited in the garden but now that I know where water is slow to drain I know where to plant those trees, shrubs and perennials that like wet environments.  There is an upside to poor drainage for some plants, just be sure that water is available when Mother Nature doesn’t deliver.

  • USDA announces changes to fruit, vegetable and wild rice planting rules

     USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) has announced fruit, vegetable and wild rice provisions that affect producers who intend to participate in certain programs authorized by the Agricultural Act of 2014.
    “Similar to previous programs that we’ve administered, planting fruits, vegetables or wild rice on base acres on a farm can result in a payment reduction for program participants,” said John W. McCauley, State Executive Director for the Kentucky FSA.

  • Tips on having a successful garden

    Mulching
    Mulching can make all the difference between a garden that is a joy to work and watch and one that is tedious and untidy.
    Among mulch’s greatest attributes is its ability to help control weeds.
    Mulch also helps conserve soil moisture by 50 percent or more by covering the soil to slow down evaporation. UK soil scientists have found that a mulch on the soil surface can conserve about six inches of soil water during growing season. Most of the water conserved will reduce and/or delay plant water stress.

  • Plant propagation from softwood cuttings

    The most common form of plant propagation is digging and dividing which is frequently done in early spring before new growth or in the fall before plants go dormant.  Digging and dividing is great for herbaceous plants but those plants that are considered woody ornamentals do not divide as easily with a spade. In this case we can look to the technique of rooting out softwood cuttings from the mother plant.  

  • 2014 acreage reporting deadlines

    The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) reminds agricultural producers of the acreage reporting requirements that must be met prior to receiving program benefits. Filing an accurate acreage report for all crops and land uses, including failed acreage and prevented planting acreage, can prevent the loss of benefits for a variety of programs.
    In order to comply with FSA program eligibility requirements, all producers are encouraged to visit their local FSA office to file an accurate crop certification report by the applicable deadline.

  • Sowder Cattle Company joins American Angus Association membership

    Sowder Cattle Company, Cynthiana, Kentucky, is a new member of the American Angus Association®, reports Bryce Schumann, CEO of the national breed organization headquartered in Saint Joseph, Mo.
    The American Angus Association, with over 24,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest beef breed association in the world. Its computerized records include detailed information on more than 17 million registered Angus.

  • 2013-14 Conservation District annual meeting

    The Harrison County Soil and Water Conservation District held its annual meeting April 25 at the Harrison County Cooperative Extension Office.  The district served as host to nearly 200 people.  
    A free dinner was served consisting of pulled pork and hot dogs cooked by County Judge Alex Barnett, coleslaw, baked beans, chips, and cookies from JJ’s Sweets; all served by the Harrison County Conservation District board supervisors and NRCS officials.

  • Tomato 101: For beginners and advanced gardeners alike

    There are many assumptions about the tomato that sometimes get passed on by the most well-meaning aficionado.  
    I take my tomatoes seriously and have developed a routine to hedge my bets for a healthy summer harvest.
    When it comes to spring fever, the tomato is most abused. Most people still plant too early.  
    First, wait until our frost-free date (on average this is May 10th, give or take a week depending on where you are located).  

  • Acclimate plants carefully to prevent burning foliage

    I made a big mistake last year and burned up my Kalanchoes - it took the entire summer for these cool succulents to recover.  
    I will not make that mistake again. After adding another crinkled-leaf variety to my collection that I purchased from Gallrein’s greenhouses last week, I set to the task of resetting our patio with plants and seat cushions.