.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Farming

  • Toads are a good sign of healthy environment

    Lately it seems that everywhere I step in the yard, vegetable garden and perennial beds there is a toad under foot.  
    They manage to jump out of harm’s way (from a rapidly approaching foot or spade) just in the nick of time.  When I notice healthy populations of a good insect, bug or amphibian, I like to think that they are flourishing because of the ecological balance of the farm.  
    Toads are an indicator species suggesting in their abundance that the environment is healthy; in their absence that it is not.  

  • USDA reminds producers of 2014 acreage reporting requirement

    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Kentucky  Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director John W. McCauley reminds agricultural producers that July 15, 2014, is the deadline to file an acreage report for spring seeded crops. Planted acres must be reported to FSA by July 15, 2014.  The Agricultural Act of 2014 (2014 Farm Bill) requires producers on a farm to submit annual acreage reports on all cropland.

  • United States and Korea streamline organic trade

    Organic processed products certified in the United States or Korea can now be labeled as organic in either country. This will allow American organic farmers, processors, and businesses greater access to Korea’s growing market for organic products. The arrangement between the two nations took effect July 1, 2014.

  • Local conservation cost share programs available to landowners and homeowners

    The Harrison County Conservation District is offering two new local cost share programs available to county landowners and homeowners.  
    Applications will be accepted July 1 through July 31 for the Gateway and Barn Access Erosion Control Program and the Rain Barrel/Compost Bin Program.
    The purpose of the Gateway/Barn Access Erosion program is to assist landowners with the necessary means to repair gateways and barn entrances to reduce degradation, soil erosion, and pollution.  

  • Organic fertilizer recipe, good for soil, plant

    If you are a regular reader of my column you likely know that I much prefer an organic approach to farm and gardening and that I believe that building healthy soil produces healthy food.  
    As I continue to learn more about pest control and fertility, the more I have come to understand why healthy plants and animals have an edge over their synthetically doped counterparts.
    The other day I needed to do some fertilization in the vegetable patch so I gathered up some supplies that included bags of alfalfa meal, bone meal and cottonseed meal.  

  • Powdery mildew

    Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungus around.  
    It is not too terribly picky about where it spreads, it likes humid weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started.  
    The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing, pruning and treatment before it spreads.
    Powdery mildew is caused by several different fungi, I won’t bore you with their names because they all act the same way.  

  • Kentucky Proud Vender Day planned for July 26

    By Vickie Fryman

  • Junior High Rodeo
  • Champion honors
  • French hydrangeas bloom on old wood

    It seems that we have been spoiled: A decade of mostly mild winters has led us to believe that all those borderline hardy plants would never get knocked back by a cold winter.
    Well, I have seen quite a few crape myrtles, figs and French hydrangeas that are struggling to come back on old wood.
    Fear not, however, because these plants are root hardy and will sprout new growth from the roots.